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Strategic framework for the prevention of HIV infections in infants in Europe
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNAIDS; UNICEF; United Nations Population Fund ( 2004 )
Abstract

The European Region of WHO, and particularly the eastern part, is facing one of the fastest growing HIV/AIDS epidemics in the world. The number of HIV-infected women is steadily increasing, as is the transmission of the infection to newborns. Nevertheless, the high level of coverage with antenatal care, the availability of an extensive health care infrastructure, high literacy levels, the relatively low number of infections, and effective interventions to reduce mother-to-child transmission offer an opportunity to eliminate HIV infection in infants from the Region, and thus provide a model for the rest of the world. The challenge is to prepare health systems affected by economies in transition - and particularly maternal and child health services - to deal, in an integrated manner, with transmission of HIV infection to infants. This goes beyond clinical care and needs to include a range of care and protection issues, both in health institutions and in the community. The Strategic Framework for the Prevention of HIV Infection in Infants in Europe was developed by the UNAIDS cosponsors under the leadership of WHO, based on the experience of countries in the Region. The Strategic Framework outlines strategies for implementation at country level to achieve the global goals and those for Europe and Central Asia set out in the Dublin Declaration

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Operation MECACAR : eradicating polio 1995-2000 : final report
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; Polio Plus Rotary International; UNICEF; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.); United States. Agency for International Development ( 2001 )
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Development of food and nutrition action plans in countries of South-East Europe : report on a third workshop, Brijuni, Croatia 12 September 2002
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF ( 2002 )
Abstract

The purpose of the workshop was to follow-up on the progress of the South-East European countries in their development of food and nutrition action plans. This initiative builds on the natural advantages and the geo-economic position of the region in relation to food and nutrition policy, promotes sustainable development in the region and improves skills needed to develop intersectoral policies in relation to food and nutrition. The workshop on Development of Food and Nutrition Action Plans in Countries of South-East Europe took place on 12 September 2002 in Brijuni, Croatia. Participating countries presented their progress in developing action plans followed by discussion on priorities for implementing national food and nutrition action plans, the Stability Pact Initiative and UNICEF work in the South-East European region. The participants expressed their interest, support and continued involvement in the project

Complementary feeding and the control of iron deficiency anaemia in the Newly Independent States : presenation by WHO at a WHO/UNICEF consultation, Geneva, Switzerland 4 February 1999
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF ( 1999 )
Abstract

The WHO Working Group on Complementary Feeding and the Control of Iron Deficiency was invited to present an overview of current infant and young child feeding practices in the WHO European Region at a Joint UNICEF/WHO Consultation on Iron Deficiency Anaemia. A number of nutritional recommendations from the former Soviet era, which differ from international standards, were identified. Poor complementary feeding practices help to explain the poor iron status of infants and young children in the WHO European Region, particularly in the countries of the former Soviet Union and the central Asian republics. The Working Group outlined guidelines for the revision and updating of recommendations on complementary feeding, to facilitate the establishment of good complementary feeding practices in the Region. If these recommendations are embraced, they should have a significant positive impact on the general nutrition and iron status of young children

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Food, nutrition and health policy for women and their families : report on a WHO workshop, Murmansk, Russian Federation, 13-17 September 1999
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF ( 1999 )
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Development of food and nutrition action plans in South East Europe : report on a second workshop, Sofia, 8-11 October 2001
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; UNICEF ( 2002 )
Abstract

The first consultation on development of food and nutrition action plans in the countries of southeastern Europe took place in Slovenia in June 2000. This second consultation provided the opportunity for these countries to present their draft food and nutrition action plans. These were discussed and advice was given on how to finalize action plans. Participants were keen to set up a nutrition network. The 50 participants came from 11 countries (Annex 3) and represented the health, welfare, environment and agriculture sectors. The workshop was jointly organized by WHO, UNICEF and FAO. This show of interest and commitment across sectors demonstrates that the vital cross-sectoral links between nutrition, food safety and social concerns are being recognized and acted upon by policy-makers

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Development of a global strategy on infant and young child feeding : report on a WHO/UNICEF consultation for the WHO European Region, Budapest, Hungary 28 May-1 June 2001 compiled and written by Dr Joceline Pomerleau
Pomerleau, Joceline; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF ( 2001 )
Abstract

Malnutrition is responsible, directly or indirectly, for half of the 10.5 million deaths each year among children under five years of age. Two-thirds of these deaths occur during the first year of life, and are closely associated with poor breastfeeding and poor complementary feeding practices. Only a minority of infants worldwide are exclusively breastfed during the first months of life, and complementary feeding is often unsafe, inappropriate and inadequate. Malnourished children who survive suffer increased morbidity, impaired development and reduced school performance. Poor feeding practices and their consequences are not only a violation of children's rights but they also threaten social and economic development. In March 2000, a technical consultation on infant and young child feeding was undertaken by WHO in collaboration with UNICEF to discuss issues around feeding policies and practices. Based on the results of this consultation and on accumulated evidence of the importance of the first years for early child growth, a new global strategy was drafted. The aims of the strategy are to improve the feeding of infants and young children and to increase the commitment of governments, civil society and international organizations to protecting, promoting and supporting optimal infant and young child feeding. In May 2001, representatives of 16 Member States in the WHO European Region, as well as nutritional and health experts, gathered in Budapest to discuss this Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding. The participants contributed to the draft of this new strategy and discussed issues related to its implementation at the national and regional level

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Development of food and nutrition action plans in the Baltic countries : report on a second consultation, Riga, 19-20 June 2001
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; Nordic Council of Ministers ( 2001 )
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Prevention and control of iron-deficiency anaemia in women and children : report of the UNICEF/WHO regional consultation, Geneva, Switzerland 3-5 February 1999
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF ( 2001 )
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Comparative analysis of implementation of the Innocenti Declaration in WHO European member states : monitoring Innocenti targets on the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; UNICEF ( 1999 )
Abstract

The Innocenti Declaration states that by 1995 all Member States should have achieved the targets outlined in the Innocenti Declaration and progress was reported at the World Health Assembly in 1998. By 1995 each Member State should have: appointed a national breastfeeding coordinator; established a multi-sectoral breastfeeding committee; ensured that all maternity facilities practice all Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding; taken action to give effect to the principles and aims of all Articles of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes and subsequent relevant World Health Assembly resolutions; and enacted legislation protecting the breastfeeding rights of working women. The information in this document is based on completed questionnaires filled out by national nutrition counterparts regarding implementation of the Innocenti Declaration. The document provides a useful tool to compare situations, both at a European level and within sub-regions of Europe. Both WHO and UNICEF encourage and support national authorities in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating policies related to protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding