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Guidelines for city action on alcohol / by Shireen Mathrani
Mathrani, Shireen; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1998 )
Abstract

In support of local action, the WHO Regional Office for Europe has set up a Multi-City Action Plan (MCAP) on Alcohol, as part of the WHO Healthy Cities project. The cities involved in the MCAP on Alcohol agree to share experience, develop expertise and provide examples of good practice to other cities within and outside of the project. They work to an agreed joint plan of action and time-frame. Essentially they form a network of cities across Europe, committed to taking positive action on the prevention of alcohol-related problems. This document consists of practical guidelines which have been prepared as an aid to cities in Europe that may be interested in taking action on alcohol at the municipal level. The guidelines incorporate the experience of several MCAP cities, as well as Florence in Italy and Oxford in the United Kingdom. They are based on A guide to alcohol action which was written as a result of a two-year project in Oxford

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Rolling revisions of the guidelines for drinking-water quality : aspects of protection and control and of microbiological quality : report on a WHO meeting, Medmenham, United Kingdom, 17-21 March 1998
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1999 )
Abstract

The WHO Guidelines for drinking-water quality provide important information for regulators, scientists and practitioners concerned with drinking-water supply and quality worldwide. Since the second edition of the Guidelines was published, a process of continuous updating has been implemented, supported by three working groups addressing microbiological aspects, chemical aspects and aspects of protection and control. A WHO Working Group of 23 experts met to discuss the progress to date and the future planning of the process of revision. The Working Group reviewed the development of a series of technical guidance documents and recommended publishing those dealing with fluoride and cyanobacteria. It also adopted microbiology review documents for Aeromonas, hepatitis viruses, Legionella, protozoa and Vibrio cholerae and developed a future strategy for revising the microbiological aspects of the Guidelines

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Protection and control of water quality for the updating of the WHO guidelines for drinking-water quality : report on a WHO working group, Bad Elster, Germany 17-19 June 1996
Working Group on Protection and Control of Water Quality (1996 : Bad Elster, Germany); World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1997 )
Abstract

The WHO guidelines for drinking-water quality are an important resource for the maintenance of the supply and quality of drinking-water worldwide. Since the publication of the second edition, a process of continuous updating has begun, and will extend coverage to aspects of risk management, as well as risk assessment. A WHO working group of 14 experts met in Bad Elster, Germany, at the Research Department of the Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the WHO collaborating centre for research on drinking-water hygiene, to discuss aspects of risk management, including resource and source protection, water treatment, materials and chemicals used in the production and distribution of drinking-water, and the monitoring and assessment of drinking-water supply and quality. The group made detailed recommendations on the content and format of priority guidance and developed a programme of work for its preparation, aiming for publication of the first set of guidelines by the end of 1997

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Breastfeeding : how to support success : a practical guide for health workers / by Tine Vinther and Elisabet Helsing
Vinther, Tine; Helsing, Elisabet; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1997 )
Abstract

Mothers eager to brestfeed their infants are often reliant on health workers for advice regarding breastfeeding. The knowledge and attitude of health workers can influence the success or failure of breastfeeding. However, the formal education of health workers on how to help mothers to cope with the process of lactation is often inadequate. This document is designed to guide health workers in the process of supporting mothers to breastfeed successfully

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Development of WHO guidelines for safe recreational water environments : report on a WHO expert consultation, St Helier, Jersey, United Kingdom 23-30 May 1997
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1998 )
Abstract

The recreational use of fresh and coastal waters, as well as swimming pools and spas, is widespread around the world. Concern has been expressed about adverse health effects associated with such use, which can arise from accidents, poor water quality, toxic organisms and exposure to sun and heat, for example. WHO has therefore initiated the preparation of guidelines for safe recreational water environments, which included convening a four-part Consultation, hosted by the Public Services Department, Jersey, United Kingdom. At the Consultation, 32 experts discussed the further development of the guidelines, and made a series of detailed recommendations on their finalization. Immediate action was to be taken following the Consultation to complete the various volumes of the guidelines by the end of 1999

Best practice in estimating the costs of alcohol : recommendations for future studies / edited by Lars Moeller and Srdan Matic
Moeller, Lars; Matic, Srdan; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2010 )
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WHO Regional Office for Europe guidance for influenza surveillance in humans
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2009 )
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European status report on alcohol and health 2010
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2010 )
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Guidelines on improving the physical fitness of employees
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; WHO European Centre for Environment and Health ( 2000 )
Abstract

Low physical activity is a major public health issue despite the considerable health benefits that can be gained from regular activity. This document describes the rationale for keeping active and the major steps which may be undertaken at the workplace to facilitate wider involvement of staff and their families in physical activity. It presents the benefits for employers and gives examples of successful programmes in various enterprises. Ten steps covering all aspects of a workplace health programme devoted to physical activity are described in detail, followed by the important considerations in designing a programme

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Evaluation and use of epidemiological evidence for environmental health risk assessment : guideline document
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2000 )
Abstract

Environmental health risk assessment is increasingly being used in the development of environmental health policies, public health decision-making, the establishment of environmental regulations and research planning. The credibility of risk assessment depends, to a large extent, on the strength of the scientific evidence on which it is based. It is, therefore, imperative that the processes and methods used to evaluate the evidence and estimate health risks are clear and explicit, and based on valid epidemiological theory and practice. Evaluation and use of epidemiological evidence for environmental health risk assessment is a guideline document. The primary target audiences of the document are expert review groups that WHO (or other organizations) might convene in the future to evaluate epidemiological evidence on the health effects of environmental factors. This Guideline Document identifies a set of processes and general approaches to assess available epidemiological information in a clear, consistent and explicit manner. The Guideline Document should also help in the evaluation of epidemiological studies with respect to their ability to support risk assessment and, consequently, risk management. Conducting expert reviews according to such explicit guidelines would make health risk assessment, and subsequent risk management and risk communication processes, more readily understood and likely to be accepted by policy-makers and the public. It would also make the conclusions reached by reviews more readily acceptable as a basis for future WHO guidelines and other recommendations, and would provide a more rational basis for setting priorities for future research