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Title: Regional response plan for programmatic management of drug-resistant tuberculosis
Other Titles: report of meeting of WHO country offices' focalpoints, SEARO, New Delih, 4-6 April 2011
Authors: World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia
Place of publication: New Delhi
Language: English
Abstract: Well-functioning national TB control programmes in the Region have resulted in low levels (Range: 1.7- 4.2%) of multidrug-resistance (MDR) among newly detected cases. Among the previously treated cases in the Region, MDR-TB rates range from 10.0 - 34.7%. However, given the large numbers of TB cases in the SEA Region, this translates to 130 000 MDR-TB cases (110 000-170 000) accounting for nearly one third of the world's total. During the past few years, steady progress has been made in the Region in initiating MDR-TB cases on treatment. The Green Light Committee had approved the case management of patients with MDR-TB under national programmes in 10 countries. Until the end of 2010, more than 5000 patients with MDR-TB had been registered for treatment in the Region. Extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) has also been reported from five countries in the Region. MDR-TB could potentially replace drug-susceptible TB and constitutes a threat to global public health security. In areas of high HIV prevalence, the potential for increased transmission of MDR-TB is high. Considerable efforts are required to expand the capacity of countries, including strong planning to adequately respond to this challenge. All activities need to be in alignment with the latest WHO guidelines. A regional response plan has been developed with all country focal points to have a common understanding of activities to be undertaken and scale up MDR-TB response to reach the goals of universal access for all MRD-TB patients.
Keywords: TUBERCULOSIS
Gov't Doc #: SEA-TB-335
URI: http://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/205817
Appears in Collections:Meeting Reports



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