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Resolution health financing: a strategy for the African Region (document AFR/RC56/10)
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2011-06-22 )
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Regional Committee Report
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
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Health research: agenda for the WHO African Region: report of the Regional Director
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2011-06-22 )
Abstract

1. Health research is important for health development. This document briefly describes the major issues of health research in the African Region. Based on the recommendations of the Abuja and Accra high-level ministerial meetings, it proposes what needs to be done, and the way forward. 2. Countries should allocate at least 2% of national health expenditures and at least 5% of project and programme aid for research and research capacity building; invest more on research aimed at improving the health system; and ensure a strong national health research system based on an enabling environment for research. 3. WHO and partners will support Member States to build national health research systems; develop capacity to conduct health research; identify health research priorities; evaluate research results; translate knowledge to solve health-related problems by using evidence to inform policy.

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Knowledge management in the WHO African Region strategic directions report of the Regional Director
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
Abstract

Efficient Knowledge Management is now considered a key factor in organizational performance and competitiveness. New Knowledge Management approaches, including those using information and communication technology, can improve efficiency through better time management, quality service, innovation and cost reduction. 2. The WHO Knowledge Management Strategy, the WHO Regional Office for Africa strategic orientations for 2005–2009, strategies of the African Union and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development, and the World Summit on the Information Society stress efficient information and knowledge management as an important contribution to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally-agreed development goals, including those related to health. 3. The weak Knowledge Management culture and limited information and communication technology (ICT) skills and infrastructure represent serious impediments to knowledge access, sharing and application. The new Knowledge Management approaches and the current ICT revolution represent, for the WHO African Region, a historic opportunity to foster a culture of Knowledge Management and overcome the digital divide in order to strengthen health systems, improve health outcomes and provide equity in health.

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Poverty, Trade and Health: an Emerging Health Development Issue Report of the Regional Director
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
Abstract

The General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) is one of the most important multilateral trade agreements to emerge from the Uruguay Round of negotiations that created the World Trade Organization. It is the multilateral legal framework through which WTO members will approach the progressive liberalization of trade in services, including health-related services. There is now an animated international debate about the impact of GATS on public services in general, and health in particular. 2. Health is critical for long-term economic development and prosperity. Improved health is beneficial to development, while development and the increased resources that it generates are vital for promoting public health. Poverty breeds ill-health which further perpetuates poverty. Illhealth also reduces human capital and productivity. Economic growth (with redistribution) is the primary means by which countries reduce poverty. 3. Trade liberalization can be a powerful tool for fostering development and reducing poverty. By providing incentives for an efficient allocation of resources, an open and transparent trade regime is an important precondition for broad-based and sustained growth.

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Regional Strategic Plan for the Expanded Programme on Immunization, 2006-2009 Report of the Regional Director
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
Abstract

1. Vaccine-preventable diseases still account for a high burden of childhood morbidity and mortality in the African Region. Regional diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT3) coverage increased from 54% in 2001 to 69% at the end of 2005. Wild poliovirus transmission is now restricted to only one country in the Region while there has been a 60% reduction in measles mortality since 1999. 2. Several challenges that limit access to and quality of immunization services in many countries include ensuring sustainable funding for immunization, continuous vaccine supply, immunization safety. Sector-wide barriers, including insufficient political commitment, insufficient trained health workers and lack of effective programme management, constitute additional challenges. 3. The goal of this strategic plan is to support Member States to provide high quality immunization services that will prevent mortality, morbidity and disability due to vaccinepreventable diseases and contribute to the strengthening of national health systems and the attainment of health Millennium Development Goals.

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Provisional Agenda of the Fifty-Sixth Session of the Regional Committee
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
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Report of the Programme Subcommittee
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
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Child Survival: a Strategy for the African Region Report of the Regional Director
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
Abstract

The past 20 years have witnessed improvements in child survival due to effective public health interventions and better economic and social performance worldwide. Nevertheless, about 10.6 million children die yearly, 4.6 million of these in the African Region. About one quarter of these deaths occur in the first month of life, over two thirds in the first seven days. The majority of under-five deaths are due to a small number of common, preventable and treatable conditions such as infections, malnutrition and neonatal conditions occurring singly or in combination. 2. The average decline in under-five mortality experienced globally over the years is mainly attributed to decline in rates in countries with rapid economic development. The African Region needs to increase its average annual mortality reduction rate to 8.2% per annum if Millennium Development Goal 4 is to be achieved by 2015. A number of affordable recommended interventions have been identified which could prevent 63% of current mortality. 3. The key to making progress towards attaining the goal by 2015 is reaching every newborn and child in every district with a limited set of priority interventions. New and serious commitments are necessary to prioritize and accelerate child survival efforts and allocate resources within countries

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Revitalizing Health Service Using the Primary Health Care Approach in the African Region Report of the Regional Director
Regional Committee for Africa, 56 ( 2006 )
Abstract

1. Implementation of Primary Health Care (PHC) in the Region initially led to improvements in the health of the people. The subsequent decline in performance of PHC was associated with a number of constraints in relation to intersectoral collaboration, community participation, human resources development, managerial capacity, resource mobilization, information base and research capacity. However, a review of PHC 25 years after Alma-Ata revealed that the strategy is still relevant. 2. Universal access requires well-functioning district health systems that are able to deliver essential interventions to communities, families and individuals timely and at an affordable cost. The Primary Health Care strategy, adapted to the current and anticipated environment, provides an appropriate framework for universal access to essential health care. 3. The approach proposed in this document is aimed at revitalizing health services using Primary Health Care based on priority interventions to enhance community participation, strengthen managerial capacity, improve generation and use of evidence, strengthen collaboration and partnerships, and improve quality and coverage of essential health services.