Regional Committee Meeting 62 Kathmandu, Nepal, 7-10 September 2009 Collection home page View Statistics

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Collection's Items (Sorted by Submit Date in Descending order): 1 to 20 of 35
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SEA/RC62/R1- Programme Budget Matters
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/R2 - Climate change and human health
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/R3 - South-East Asia regional efforts on measles elimination
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/R4 - Engaging the private sector in providing health services to meet national health systems goals
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/R5 - South-East Asia regional health emergency fund
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/R6 - Measures to ensure access to safe, efficacious, quality and affortdable medical products
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/R7 - Resolution of thanks
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09 )
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SEA/RC62/27 - Report of the sixty-second session of the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-10 )
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SEA/RC62/25 - Report of the subcomittee on credentials
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09-25 )
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SEA/RC62/28 - List of official documents
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09-10 )
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SEA/RC62/26 - List of resolutions and decisions
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09-09 )
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SEA/RC62/24 Rev - List of participants
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-09-08 )
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SEA/RC62/6 - Consideration of the recommendations arising out of the technical discussions on "protecting human health from climate change"
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-08-28 )
Abstract

This paper is a summary of the Technical Discussions on” Protecting Human Health from Climate Change", held in New Delhi, 18–21 August 2009. It covers the key issues involved, the consensus obtained during the Technical Discussions and the recommendations emanating thereof. The paper is now being submitted as information document to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for consideration of the recommendations arising out of the Technical Discussions on” Protecting Human Health from Climate Change”.

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SEA/RC62/23 - Time and place of future sessions of the regional committee
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-08-11 )
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SEA/RC62/18 Rev. - Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: combating counterfeit medical products
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-08 )
Abstract

The involvement of WHO in combating counterfeit medicines is based on its role in public health; counterfeit medicines would affect the health-care system and lead to adverse health effects. Counterfeit medicines also involve many other areas such as commerce, law enforcement and intellectual property rights, which make the issue complex. WHO has been engaged in combating counterfeit medicine since 1985, but this paper discusses activities since 2008. Following the World Health Assembly discussions on the topic in 2008, the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia discussed the issue and developed a clear definition of counterfeit medical products that clearly excluded intellectual property disputes. During the discussions at the Executive Board in Geneva in January 2009, there were certain extraneous incidents that sought to link intellectual property rights to counterfeit products. This resulted in a request for further information to be presented at the 2009 World Health Assembly. The issue was, however, not taken up at the World Health Assembly due to the shortened session. There are many issues that are still unresolved and this paper poses questions that need to be dealt with by Member States before the World Health Assembly in 2010. The attached working paper was submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations for consideration by the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee. The HLP meeting proposed a draft resolution for the consideration of the Regional Committee. The paper is now submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration, and for its decision regarding the resolution proposed by the HLP meeting.

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SEA/RC62/5 - Matters relating to programme development and management: A. Preparation for programme budget 2010-2011 including implementation of the regional committee resolution SEA/RC61/R2: B. Discussions on impact of global financial crisis
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-21 )
Abstract

The Programme Budget for 2010-2011 was finalized over the last year, following up on the recommendations of the First Meeting of the Subcommittee on Policy and Programme Development and Management (SPPDM) and the Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee. Because of the current financial crisis and the recommendations of the 124th session of the Executive Board, the Director-General decided to request a reduction in the proposed budget. The SEA Region’s proposed budget was reduced by US$ 60 million to US$ 544.5 million, although this still represents an 11% increase over the 2008-2009 budget. While Assessed Contributions (AC) decreased by 1.5%, the budget for Voluntary Contributions (VC) rose by 14%, thus increasing the proportion of VC funding to 81% of the total budget. The reductions in the proposed budget were not evenly distributed across the Strategic Objectives (SOs), with the largest reductions being effected in the area of communicable diseases that still form 48% of the total budget of the Region. This was largely due to the Member States requesting further support for Strategic Objectives related to the Millennium Development Goals and noncommunicable diseases. The paper discusses the current situation of VC in respect of the SEA Region and notes that there is still a tendency for donors to support the communicable diseases programmes. This makes it especially difficult for the Region to mobilize resources for other programme areas, a challenge to achieve full funding for the budgets of all SOs. Some progress has been made in following up on resolution SEA/RC61/R2, adopted at the Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee. This includes requests for additional AC and VC funding for those programme areas where resource mobilization has been difficult. The resolution also requests further attention on the measurement of programme achievements, using the results to improve implementation. Steps have been taken to improve accountability and these will be reflected in the Region’s workplans for the 2010- 2011 biennium. More AC funding has been provided to support country offices and this is likely to ensure improved implementation of WHO-supported work in countries. The Second Meeting of the Subcommittee on Policy and Programme Development and Management (SPPDM) was requested to review these developments related to the 2010-2011 Programme Budget and make recommendations for consideration by the Sixtysecond Session of the Regional Committee. The SPPDM made the following recommendations: Action by Member States (1) Continue efforts to increase resource mobilization in underfunded programme areas; however, targets for these areas should be realistic; (2) consider ways to promote more flexibility in funding programme areas that lack resources; and (3) take steps to improve monitoring and assessment to ensure greater efficiency in implementation. Action by WHO/SEARO (1) Enhance resource mobilization, especially in underfunded countries and programme areas; (2) increase training in programme management, especially at the country level; and (3) implement the Programme Budget 2010-2011 in a manner that is more responsive to efforts of respective Member States in mitigating the impact of the global financial crisis on health. The paper is now submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

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SEA/RC62/10 - Engagement with the private sector
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-21 )
Abstract

Engagement with the private sector was put forward for discussion by Thailand at the Sixtyfirst Regional Committee for South-East Asia in 2008, to be developed as an agenda item for the 124th Executive Board in January 2009. The Executive Board agreed that the topic be further deliberated upon at the Sixty-second World Health Assembly in 2009. In light of the urgent issue of the influenza A (H1N1) outbreak, Member States agreed that the topic of engagement with the private sector be postponed for discussion at the Sixty-third World Health Assembly in 2010. This background paper highlights key technical issues that underline the central importance of governance in effective engagement of the private sector. A large and varied private sector plays a dominant role in health in the South-East Asia Region in terms of both finance and provision of services. Evidence indicates that households in the Region rely on private provision even for essential services like maternal and child health care, and that this is financed through high out-of-pocket payments – more so than anywhere else in the world. However, much of this activity is unregulated and does not contribute effectively to the national health agenda. Where the role of the private sector is already large, the relative costs and benefits of effective engagement for universal coverage compared with scaling-up public provision make it an option for serious policy consideration. Such mixed strategies would need appropriate modalities for partnership and new capacities to be developed on both sides. Furthermore, this approach does not preclude political and social stands on the preferred roles of government and private sector in health based on ideology as well as the strengths and weaknesses of government. Importantly, “more” private sector does not mean “privatization” or “less” government; rather, it implies a strong government presence, only in a different role, one that emphasizes governance and financing rather than direct provision. Based on country experience, this paper underlines the importance of government capacity in strategic engagement of the private sector in health. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting considered the working paper SEA/HLPMeet/ 2.2 on the subject. This revised working paper is now being submitted to the Sixtysecond Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration. The HLP meeting also proposed a draft resolution for consideration of the Regional Committee. The paper is now submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration, and for its decision regarding the resolution proposed by the HLP meeting.

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SEA/RC62/17 - Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: public health, innovation and intellectual property
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-21 )
Abstract

After intensive negotiations over a two-year period, the World Health Assembly in May 2008 adopted resolution WHA61.21 on public health, innovation and intellectual property together with the global strategy and plan of action (GSPOA). Several outstanding issues were finalized and adopted during the Sixty-second World Health Assembly in May 2009. The GSPOA aims to promote new thinking on innovation and access to medicines, and to enhance needs-based research and development (R&D) relevant to diseases that mainly affect developing countries. The scope of the GSPOA however is vast; thus, there may be a need for prioritization at national and regional levels. The attached working paper was submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations for consideration by the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee. The HLP meeting made the following recommendations: Action by Member States (1) To continue to work with other relevant sectors in order to make sure that the public health implications are taken into consideration when trade agreements are negotiated and when implementing policies or enacting laws on intellectual property; (2) continue to build the capacity of health officials with regard to international trade agreements and intellectual property rights; and (3) hold multisectoral national consultations where health, trade, commerce and foreign ministries are represented. Action by WHO/SEARO (1) Continue to assist Member States in their efforts to build capacity of health officials on international trade agreements and intellectual property rights; and (2) continue to support Member States’ efforts to deal with the public health implications of intellectual property rights. Where possible, the Regional Office should take a proactive approach in informing the countries. The paper is now submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

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SEA/RC62/8 - Measles
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-21 )
Abstract

The global goal for measles control is reducing measles mortality by 90% in 2010 in comparison to 2000. Nevertheless, the Americas (2002), the Eastern Mediterranean (2010), Europe (2012) and the Western Pacific regions (2012) of WHO have set their respective measles elimination goals. The African Region has set a pre-elimination goal of reducing measles mortality by 98% in 2012 compared to 2000 estimates. In the South-East Asia (SEA) Region, which has a measles morality reduction goal, four Member States are implementing measles elimination strategies and all Member States except India have reached an advanced stage of measles mortality reduction. With the success in the Americas and progress in three regions with an elimination goal, there is interest in exploring the feasibility of setting a global measles elimination goal. Accordingly, the 125th session of the WHO Executive Board directed the WHO Secretariat to submit a report on the “feasibility of global elimination of measles” to the 126th session of the Executive Board in January 2010. The Regional Office will also organize a regional consultation from 25-27 August 2009 to consider the feasibility of a regional measles elimination goal. This paper presents an update on the progress in achieving the goal of measles mortality reduction in the SEA Region. The important considerations in establishing a measles elimination goal include achieving high and sustainable routine immunization coverage; a highly sensitive surveillance system; availability of funding; adequate vaccine supply of assured quality; and application of lessons learnt from polio eradication. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for the Regional Committee reviewed this paper, asked the Secretariat to update it in light of the discussions, and recommended the inclusion of “measles” on the agenda of the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee to be held in September 2009. The outcome of the regional measles consultation (August 2009) will be attached as an annex to this document. The HLP meeting also proposed a draft resolution for the consideration by the Regional Committee. The paper is now submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration, and for its decision regarding the resolution proposed by the HLP meeting.

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SEA/RC62/15 - Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-21 )
Abstract

Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. In the first four months of 2009*, 40 polio cases were detected in India with 14 type 1 poliovirus (P1) and 26 type 3 poliovirus (P3) cases. This paper presents an update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication. At the start of 2008 a reduction in the transmission of P1 cases, particularly in western Uttar Pradesh (UP) was seen, which, however, was offset by re-importation from Bihar in the latter half of the year, resulting in 62 type P1 cases. Rapid and large-scale mop-up immunizations prevented P1 importation into neighbouring states. The type P3 outbreak of 2007 was rapidly controlled with massive outbreak response and mop-up operations. There are several challenges to the eradication of polio from the Region. The principal challenge in India is overcoming suboptimal vaccine efficacy in the districts of western UP, which continues to be polio-endemic. Another key challenge in the endemic areas is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. While some efforts have been made by the government, these are at present not of sufficient scale to have an impact. More needs to be done in this area. The main challenge for other countries in the Region, in particular the countries that share an open border with India, is to protect their polio-free status by preventing reinfection. A strong routine immunization programme that can deliver and maintain OPV3 coverage greater than 80% in all districts in all countries will help prevent reinfection. Additionally, all polio-free countries must conduct periodic risk assessment to determine the level of risk of reinfection and its spread, and to decide whether or not polio immunization campaigns will be required to boost population immunity. Finally, polio eradication requires substantial funding. A substantial proportion is being met through external funding. Member States can help the eradication effort by committing funds for surveillance, outbreak response, and strengthening routine immunization delivery. The attached working paper was submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations for consideration by the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee. The HLP meeting made the following recommendations: Action by Member States (1) To provide funds to improve and sustain high routine immunization coverage in all districts of the country and provide funds to strengthen AFP surveillance as relevant to the Member State; (2) conduct periodic risk assessment for polio importation and reinfection, particularly in those Member States in close proximity to the polio-endemic areas. Action by WHO/SEARO (1) Review the criteria used for risk assessment for polio and provide these for use by Member States; (2) in Member States that rely on the support of WHO-supported surveillance medical officers networks should support all vaccine-preventable disease surveillance; (3) work with Member States and with donors to maintain the required levels of funding for polio eradication, routine immunization and vaccine preventable disease control, including surveillance. The paper is now submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

Collection's Items (Sorted by Submit Date in Descending order): 1 to 20 of 35

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