Regional Committee Meeting 66 New Delhi, India, 11-13 September 2013 Collection home page View Statistics

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Collection's Items (Sorted by Submit Date in Descending order): 1 to 20 of 36
RC66-27 List of official documents.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/27 - List of official documents
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-09-16 )
SEA/RC66/25 - Draft report of the sixty-sixth session of the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-09-13 )
RC66-28 Reports of the sub-committee on credentials.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/28 - Report of the sub-committee on credentials
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-09-11 )
RC66-16 Agenda 4.7.4 - Progress reports on selected Regional Committee resolutions.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/16 - Progress reports on selected regional committee resolutions: consultative expert working group on research and development: financing and coordination (SEA/RC65/R3)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-30 )
Abstract

Resolution SEA/RC65/R3 has outlined detailed recommendations and action points for Member States and WHO on the follow-up of the Consultative Expert Working Group on Research and Development: Financing and Coordination (CEWG). The background to the resolution is as follows: the CEWG presented its report to the Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly in May 2012. This report made a number of proposals for new and innovative sources of financing to stimulate research and development (R&D) related to Type II and Type III diseases, and the specific R&D needs of developing countries in relation to Type I diseases. By resolution WHA65.22, Member States resolved to hold consultations at the national level among all relevant stakeholders, as well as in each of the six WHO regional committee meetings scheduled for 2012. They also resolved to hold an open-ended meeting of Member States at WHO headquarters, Geneva to develop consensus. Pursuant to this, Member States of the WHO South-East Asia Region held consultations at national levels and participated in a Regional Technical Consultation from 15 to 17 August 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand, organized by the Regional Office for South-East Asia to develop a regional perspective on the CEWG report. This regional position was reflected in resolution SEA/RC65/R3 at the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia held in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, from 5 to 7 September 2012. This resolution also provided the basis for the draft resolution during the open-ended meeting of all WHO Member States, held from 26 to 28 November 2012 in Geneva which led to resolution WHA66.22 this year. The regional resolution and WHA66.22, inter alia, urge Member States and WHO to strengthen health R&D capacities and investments for diseases that disproportionately affect developing countries. The resolutions also request WHO to establish a global health R&D observatory to monitor and analyse relevant information on health R&D as well as to promote advisory mechanisms. Resolution WHA66.22 calls for specific actions through a strategic workplan to improve monitoring and coordination, and to ensure sustainable funding for health R&D (in line with WHA61.21, Global strategy and plan of action on public health, innovation and intellectual property) and identify projects as a step towards achieving the goal of development and the delivery of affordable, effective, safe and highquality health products. To take SEA/RC65/R3 and WHA66.22 forward, the Regional Office organized a "Regional consultation for developing a strategic workplan as a follow-up of the Consultative Expert Working Group on Research and Development: Financing and Coordination” from 25 to 26 July 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. This meeting enabled discussions on the next steps on both these resolutions and for prioritizing activities for the Region (executive summary is included as an Annex). The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi, India, from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To engage in developing a strategic workplan for the Region as a follow-up of the Consultative Expert Working Group on Research and Development: Financing and Coordination. (2) To explore mechanisms for promoting and strengthening health research and development, including coordination, monitoring and capacity building. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To assist countries in promoting and in exploring mechanisms for strengthening health research and development including coordination, monitoring and capacity building. (2) To include in the working paper for presentation to the Sixty-sixth Regional Committee the outcomes of the Regional Technical Consultation (July 2013). (3) To assist in prioritizing projects, as part of the strategic workplan, through regional consultations and broad engagement of relevant stakeholders. (4) To explore information sharing mechanisms in respect of health R&D to enable identification of gaps in countries, including employing the global health R&D observatory for this purpose. The working paper and the HLP recommendations, along with an executive summary of the "Regional consultation for developing a strategic workplan as a follow-up of the Consultative Expert Working Group on Research and Development: Financing and Coordination" are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-3 Agenda 3.1 - Implementation of PB 2012-2013.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/3 - WHO reform and programme budget matters: implementation of programme budget 2012-2013
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-30 )
Abstract

This working paper provides information on the implementation status of Programme Budget 2012–2013. It covers both technical and financial aspects of implementation. The initial section of the paper provides an overview of progress towards the achievement of office-specific expected results as determined during the mid-term review and the change in their status as per the update carried out in May 2013. It also provides the results of an informal internal assessment of the Organization-wide expected results that reflect major financial outlay by the South-East Asia Region. The latter part of the paper deals with financial implementation up to 31 May 2013. The approved budget for the South-East Asia Region for 2012–2013 is US$ 384.2 million and the revised budget is US$ 417.8 million. Operational budget as per approved workplans is US$ 410.5 million, of which 88% is funded (assessed contribution (AC) resources of US$ 98.1 million and voluntary contribution (VC) resources of US$ 265.8 million). The overall implementation rate against budget is 54%. The paper discusses the uneven distribution of resources across countries as well as across technical areas, i.e. strategic objectives (SOs). While India and Nepal country programmes have mobilized resources in excess of 90% of their budgeted amounts, funds have been mobilized to support less than 60% of the budgets for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and Sri Lanka. Similarly, a review of technical areas reveals that SO1 and SO7 have already received funds up to 97% and 105% of their budgets respectively, while at the same time SO5 and SO6 show levels of resources lower than 60% of the budgeted figures. The Sixth Meeting of the Subcommittee on Policy and Programme Development and Management (SPPDM) held from 4 to 5 July 2013, reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To work with the WHO Representatives to ensure close collaboration that will lead to enhanced financial implementation of objectives. (2) To work with WHO Representatives to ensure that resource mobilization efforts are targeted to respond to the agreed priorities within the WHO country workplans. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To distribute the most current financial implementation status, split by budget centre and strategic objective, to delegates of the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee. (2) For WHO Representatives and the Regional Office to work with respective Member States to ensure the resource shortfalls in the WHO workplans are understood, and joint efforts are sought to fill them. The working paper and the SPPDM recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-6 Agenda item 4 1 - UHC Technical Discussion.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/6 - Consideration of the recommendations arising out of the technical discussions on "Universal Health Coverage": (report of the technical discussions)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-26 )
Abstract

The Regional Director convened a regional meeting to hold Technical Discussions on ”Universal Health Coverage” from 10 to 12 July 2013 in New Delhi, India, as per the decision of the Sixty-fifth Session of the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia. The report of the Technical Discussions is submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its information and consideration.

RC66-23 Agenda item 7.1 Time and place of future RCs.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/23 - Time and place of future sessions of the Regional Committee
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-25 )
RC66-11 Rev.1 Agenda 4.6.1 Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/11 Rev.1 - Reports of WHO global working/advisory groups: pandemic influenza preparedness framework
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-25 )
Abstract

Since 1957, influenza viruses have been shared by Member States through the WHO global influenza surveillance and response network (GISRS); but in 2007 issues were raised about how this might be linked to access to vaccines and other benefits. To address these issues, resolution WHA60.28 recommended the Director-General to:  develop a framework and mechanism for benefit sharing  establish an international stockpile of influenza A (H5N1) vaccine  prepare guidance on vaccine distribution. The resulting Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework (PIP Framework) is expected to enhance capacity for surveillance, risk assessment and early warning. The PIP Framework also aims to prioritize financial and ”in-kind” benefits to developing, H5N1-affected countries that lack capacity to produce/access influenza vaccines, diagnostics and pharmaceuticals, according to public health risk and needs (i.e. there will be a structured approach to the proportional allocation of the benefit to Member States). The financial component of the expected benefit (the Partnership Contribution) is expected to be US$ 28 million per year. Approximately US$ 18 million of the Partnership Contribution was received by WHO in 2012. In order to implement the PIP Framework at national level, Member States should continue to share influenza viruses with pandemic potential with a WHO reference laboratory for influenza of their choice. Transfer of influenza viruses, and products derived from them (also referred to as PIP biological materials), is governed by type 1 and type 2 Standard Material Transfer Agreements (SMTAs). Type 1 SMTAs govern the transfer of viruses from national influenza centres to GISRS laboratories, so their adoption is a part of national implementation. Type 2 SMTAs govern the transfer of viruses to third parties (typically manufacturers of vaccines and pharmaceuticals). Although Member States have no direct role in negotiation of these agreements, they may wish to be aware of how negotiations are proceeding, and how the ensuing benefits are expected to be allocated. To date, negotiation of type 2 SMTAs has been concluded by the WHO Secretariat with only two “third parties” (GSK and the University of Florida), although discussions are underway with an additional five entities. Member States may also consider advocating for a mechanism to allow their needs to be more directly articulated to the Advisory Group/Secretariat in order to inform decisions about the allocation of benefit, and the negotiation of “in-kind” benefits/technology transfer. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached document and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To ensure that concerned laboratories continue to share influenza viruses in a timely manner, including those with pandemic potential. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To further accelerate the process of negotiating type 2 SMTAs. (2) To ensure the timely involvement of Member States in the process of planning for the use of Partnership Contribution funds. (2) To support the strengthening of national influenza centres and WHO collaborating centres. The working paper and the HLP recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-15 Agenda 4.7.3 - Essential Drug Policy.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/15 - Progress reports on selected regional committee resolutions: national essential drug policy including the rational use of medicines (SEA/RC64/R5)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-24 )
Abstract

Resolution SEA/RC64/R5 urged Member States to undertake a national situational analysis to develop a contextualized roadmap for action to promote rational use of medicines. Such analyses were done by the WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia in collaboration with ministries of health in all 11 Member States. A regional consultation on effective management of medicines, held from 23 to 26 April 2013 and attended by all 11 countries, discussed the findings and concluded that: the situational analyses approach was very useful for monitoring and planning; that all areas of medicine management are under-resourced in most countries; and that partner support is generally limited and fragmented. It was recommended that:  governments and partners invest in all areas of drug management including drug supply, drug selection and use, drug regulation and drug policy;  WHO appoint adequate dedicated personnel at country and regional offices to ensure meaningful collaboration with ministries of health and to ensure better coordinated support from partners;  the situational analysis tool used by WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia be adapted and piloted for use by countries, every two years, in monitoring and planning;  all recommendations made by the regional consultation on effective management of medicines with regard to drug supply, drug selection and use, drug regulation, and drug policy and coordination are acted upon by Member States and partners;  a regular regional consultation is convened by WHO to share information on progress and to plan the way forward. These recommendations may form the basis of a regional strategy to promote rational use of medicines as recommended by resolution SEA/RC64/R5. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi, India, from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To implement the recommendations from the April 2013 regional consultation on effective management of medicines within the context of national health plans, capacity and priorities. (2) To conduct situational analysis every two years, subject to country capacity, for planning, monitoring and evaluation purposes. (3) To draft a resolution on effective management of medicines for consideration by the Sixty-sixth Regional Committee. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To support countries to implement the recommendations as proposed by the regional consultation on effective management of medicines including adaptation of the situational analysis protocol developed by WHO/SEARO into a tool for use by countries. (2) To strengthen technical support and review resource allocation to ensure the needs of countries are met in the area of medicines. The working paper and the HLP recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-8  Rev. 1 Agenda 4.3 Implementation of IHR 2005.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/8 Rev.1 - Implementation of the international health regulations (2005)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-23 )
Abstract

The International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) came into force in 2007 and required States Parties to establish core capacities to detect, assess and report potential health threats by 15 June 2012. This deadline has now passed and all 11 Member States of the South-East Asia Region have requested an extension and developed a national IHR implementation extension plan, based on a new deadline of 15 June 2014. The IHR self-monitoring data are available from 10 Member States of the Region for 2012. The data showed that the overall (average) level of IHR implementation for these 10 countries was 67%, whereas levels of IHR implementation varied from 42–86%. Implementation was also uneven across capacities, with the lowest (average regional) implementation rates being seen for preparedness (59%) and for chemical (29%) and radiation hazards (44%). Implementation of IHR (2005) core capacities also continues to present a challenge in other areas, including legislation, points of entry, surveillance and laboratory. For many of these technical areas, capacity strengthening requires constructive engagement with stakeholders in health and non-health sectors, as well as support from partners. The IHR also allows an additional extension until June 2016, to be granted by the Director-General in exceptional circumstances. Any such request must be submitted four months in advance of the 15 June 2014 deadline, and be accompanied by a new implementation plan containing:  a clear description of capacity gaps;  progress made up until that date;  proposed actions and a time frame towards establishment of capacities;  technical and financial resources required for implementation, including any external assistance required. Ministries of health and WHO should continue to strengthen advocacy for, and collaborate with non-health sector, technical and donor partners to identify gaps, including for institutional, human and financial resources. WHO and Member States should also continue to work collectively to bridge identified gaps in IHR core capacities in the most efficient and effective way, for example through the use of existing strategic approaches and by harnessing the resources of States Parties, WHO, technical partners, donors and networks according to their different comparative advantages. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi, India, from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached document and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) For countries anticipating a request for an additional two-year extension until 2016: to undertake a careful assessment of core capacities and develop a strong and feasible two-year implementation plan based on identified gaps and priorities, considering the use of existing strategic frameworks. (2) To further strengthen multisectoral response and links between human health and authorities responsible for managing and securing risks related to livestock, wildlife, environmental health, food safety, chemical safety and radiological safety. (3) To participate actively in efforts to strengthen intercountry collaboration to address identified national and regional capacity gaps, including exchange of information, joint assessments at land crossings, facilitation of study tours and strengthening regional technical networks. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To facilitate the assessment of national IHR core capacities and the development of implementation plans that would be required to accompany a request for an extension until 2016. (2) To facilitate intercountry collaboration, including strengthening networks, to address identified national and regional capacity gaps, with a focus on identified priorities, including points of entry and chemical/radiation safety. (3) To advocate for and work with partners including those responsible for managing and securing risks related to livestock, wildlife, environmental health, food safety, chemical safety and radiological safety to mobilize/provide technical and financial support for national IHR implementation plans. The working paper and the HLP recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-12 Agenda 4.6.2 Malaria Progress Report.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/12 - Reports of WHO global working/advisory groups: progress of report on malaria
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-23 )
Abstract

In line with the World Health Assembly resolution WHA64.17, Member States of the WHO South-East Asia Region have made significant progress in malaria control. Malaria cases and deaths were reduced by 35% and 85%, respectively, in 2012 compared with 2000. Resolution WHA58.2 had called upon Member States to achieve a 75% reduction in malaria case incidence and mortality rates by 2015. Four countries have achieved the first target, while all countries except one have achieved the second target. The achievements are significant but fragile, and much more needs to be done to prevent resurgence of malaria. This paper identifies the key challenges to be addressed and outlines the strategic directions for malaria control and elimination in 2014–2020. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Action by Member States (1) To sustain political and financial support for malaria control and elimination to further reduce the malaria burden and prevent its resurgence. (2) To invest in strengthening technical and management capacities in malaria control and elimination. (3) To implement measures to contain artemisinin resistance in areas where it is already present and to prevent its emergence and spread in other areas. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To provide support to develop public health specialists in malaria control and elimination. (2) To provide technical support for malaria surveillance and response and research. (3) To facilitate intercountry collaboration for malaria control and elimination across borders. The working paper and the HLP recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-18 Agenda 5.2 - Rules of Procedure of RC.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/18 - Revision to the rules of procedure of the WHO regional committee for South-East Asia
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-23 )
Abstract

In May 2012, the Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly, in its decision WHA65(9), endorsed the proposals for enhancing alignment between the Regional Committees and the Executive Board with the intent to strengthen, streamline and improve the methods of work and roles of the governing bodies. The proposals included increasing harmonization across the regional committees in relation to the nomination of Regional Directors, the review of credentials and participation of observers. In September 2012, the Sixty-fifth Regional Committee for South-East Asia adopted resolution SEA/RC65/R1 to align its Rules of Procedure with respect to harmonization of the process of nomination of the Regional Director with those of the other regions. To fully comply with the request of Member States at the Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly, the Rules of Procedure for the Regional Committee for South-East Asia must be amended, essentially to formalize that which is already in practice in the conduct of Regional Committee meetings in South-East Asia with respect to review of credentials and the participation of observers. The attached working paper provides the proposed amended language to the Rules of Procedure for the Regional Committee of South-East Asia, in alignment with the language adopted previously in four other regions. Included is a draft resolution for consideration by the Regional Committee. The Sixth Meeting of the Subcommittee on Policy and Programme Development and Management (SPPDM), held from 4 to 5 July 2013, reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendation: Action by WHO-SEARO (1) WHO country offices to consult with the Ministry of Health before suggesting names of NGOs, partners and civil society organizations. The working paper and the SPPDM recommendation are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-10 Agenda item 4.5 Regional Action Plan NCDs.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/10 - Regional action plan and targets for prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (2013-2020)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-23 )
Abstract

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of mortality globally and in the South-East Asia Region. In May 2013, the Sixty-sixth Session of the World Health Assembly unanimously adopted resolution WHA66.10 endorsing the global action plan for prevention and control of NCDs covering the period 2013–2020. The action plan focuses on the four types of NCD – cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes – which make the largest contribution to morbidity and mortality, and on four shared behavioural risk factors – tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol. The World Health Assembly also adopted the global monitoring framework, including 25 indicators, and a set of nine voluntary global targets and urged Member States to consider setting national targets based on country situation and capacity. To provide normative guidance to Member States on developing national action plans and setting national targets, the WHO Regional Director for South-East Asia convened a technical working group meeting on the “Regional Action Plan and Targets for Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases” in Bangkok, Thailand, from 11 to 13 June 2013. The TWG took stock of the current data availability and capacity of Member States to report on the nine global voluntary targets; deliberated on three additional regional targets, namely cervical cancer, oral cancer and household air pollution; discussed mechanisms to build national capacity and strengthen national surveillance and monitoring systems; and provided inputs to finalize the regional action plan for prevention and control of NCDs. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi, India, from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the working paper and made the following recommendations: Recommendations Actions by Member States (1) To develop/strengthen national action plans for prevention and control of NCDs and set national targets based on country context, taking into account global and regional action plans and voluntary targets. (2) To consider the recommendations of the Technical Working Group on strengthening national surveillance and monitoring systems including collecting baseline data on key indicators by 2015. (3) To consider drafting a resolution on noncommunicable diseases, including operative paragraphs on cervical cancer and oral cancer, for consideration by the Sixty-sixth Regional Committee. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To consider including oral health as a separate agenda item in the Sixty-sixth Regional Committee with consideration to the Regional Oral Health Strategy discussed at the regional consultation in November 2012 in Nepal. (2) To support Member States in mobilizing resources and building capacity for prevention and control of NCDs including for collecting baseline data for tracking progress on achievement of NCD targets. (3) To convene a mid-course review meeting in 2018–2019 to review the available data and make adjustments in the NCD targets as needed. The working paper and the HLP recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-21 Agenda item 6.1 Report on JCB.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/21 - Special programmes: UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO special programme for research and training in tropical diseases: joint coordinating board (JCB) - report on attendance at JCB in 2013
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-23 )
Abstract

The Joint Coordinating Board (JCB) of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases Research (TDR) acts as the governing body of the Special Programme and is responsible for its overall policy and strategy. This paper describes the background and composition of the JCB TDR. At present, there are two Member States from the South-East Asia Region (India and Thailand) that are members of the JCB under paragraph 2.2.1. The Government of Indonesia is a member until 31 December 2013 and the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal is a member until 31 December 2014 under paragraph 2.2.2 (selected by the WHO Regional Committee). All country members have valid membership up to 2013. From 1 January 2014, membership under paragraph 2.2.2 will be reduced to one member per region; therefore, no action needs to be taken by the Regional Committee.

RC66-5 Agenda 3.3 - WHO Reform and financing dialogue.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/5 - WHO reform and programme budget matters: WHO reform: financing dialogue and programme budget 2016-2017
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-22 )
Abstract

Initially, the reform agenda focused on financing and better aligning of the Organization’s objectives and resources. It has now evolved into a Member States-driven process to address more fundamental questions about WHO’s priorities, its governance and management to make the Organization more effective, efficient and accountable. During the Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly in May 2012, a consolidated paper, including background papers with proposals under each main section was submitted for in-depth discussions. During the Sixty-sixth World Health Assembly in May 2013, WHO reform was discussed under documents A66/4 (WHO reform: High-level implementation plan and report) and A66/48 (WHO reform: Financing of WHO). The report update given to the Sixty-sixth World Health Assembly presented a comprehensive overview of progress up to the end of the first quarter of 2013 in the three main areas of WHO reform: programmes and priority-setting; governance; and management, as well as a high-level implementation plan for reform. The report covers 12 elements of reform identified in the monitoring and implementation framework considered by the Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly in May 2012, and includes an additional element on change management. Document A66/4 was noted by the World Health Assembly. The Sixth Meeting of the Subcommittee on Policy and Programme Development and Management (SPPDM), held from 4 to 5 July 2013, reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To ensure appropriate participation, particularly from ministries of health, in the November 2013 financing dialogue, to ensure better understanding of the funding of the Programme Budget 2014–2015. (2) To review for consideration of its future application in respect of 2016–2017 bottom-up operational planning, the country prioritization methodology as outlined by the Secretariat. Action by WHO-SEARO (1) To provide full support to Member States in their preparation for participating in the financing dialogue in November. The working paper and the SPPDM recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

SEA-RC66-4.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/4 - WHO reform and programme budget matters: twelfth general programme of work (GPW) and proposed programme budget 2014-2015
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-22 )
Abstract

The Sixty-sixth World Health Assembly in May 2013 approved the Twelfth General Programme of Work (GPW) which establishes: the overarching health mission, principles and values; changes to the results-based framework; six high-level health leadership priorities; six categories of work; 30 technical programme areas; and the aspiration of results of the Organization for a six-year period 2014–2019. The Programme Budget 2014–2015 approved at the Sixty-sixth World Health Assembly is to be the primary instrument to express the full scope of work of the Organization, along with the roles and responsibilities of all levels of the Organization (country offices, regional offices and headquarters). It is also to be the basis for the detailed 2014–2015 operational planning that is being initiated in the final part of 2013. The attached working paper discusses the impact of the Twelfth GPW and the Programme Budget for the 2014–2015 biennium, in the context of the South-East Asia Region. The Sixth Meeting of the Subcommittee on Policy and Programme Development and Management (SPPDM), held from 4 to 5 July 2013, reviewed the attached working paper and after deliberations made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To engage in the process of allocating the budget-centre budget-space envelopes at Category Level, with initial indications given by the WHO Secretariat at the programme area level, and to prepare draft workplans for the Programme Budget 2014–2015 ahead of the Sixty-sixth Regional Committee in September 2013. (2) To collaborate with Member States in the Region, and with the WHO Secretariat to coordinate technical work with a regional perspective, where possible, to maximize utilization of a reduced Programme Budget for the 2014–2015 biennium. (3) To work closely with the Secretariat to ensure that the Programme Budget allocation method is used to determine the budget-centre budget-space-envelopes for 2014–2015. (4) To support the workplanning, within the restricted timeframe, by utilizing the proposed budget-centre budget-space-envelopes, as presented to the SPPDM. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To ensure an earlier start to, and more complete, biennial implementation by: a. ensuring that country workplans are approved in a timely manner; b. ensuring that the assessed contribution allocations are distributed promptly at the beginning of the biennium; c. ensuring that there is sufficient carried-forward voluntary contribution funding on the workplans at the beginning of the biennium for implementation to begin. (2) To work with countries in the budget planning and prioritization at programme area level, within categories, and in drafting the workplans for 2014–2015 using the proposed budget-centre budget-space-envelopes. (3) For WHO Representatives, in collaboration with Member States, to revisit the technical prioritization matrix of each country to reconfirm its validity. (4) To proceed with operational planning with a target of end-July 2013, for establishment of the draft operational plans 2014–2015. The working paper and the SPPDM recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-22 Agenda 6.2 -  Special Programmes.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/22 - Special programmes: UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank special programme of research, development and research training in human reproduction: policy and coordination committee (PCC) - report on attendance at PCC in 2013 and nomination of a member in place of Bhutan whose term expires on 31 December 2013
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-22 )
Abstract

The Policy and Coordination Committee (PCC) acts as the governing body of the Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP). The last PCC Meeting was held from 20 to 21 June 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland. Its report was presented to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting. At present, there are three Member States from the WHO South-East Asia Region (Bangladesh, Bhutan and Maldives) that are members of the PCC Category 2, while India continues to be a member of the PCC Category 1. Nepal is a member of the PCC Category 3. Since the term of office of Bhutan ends on 31 December 2013, representatives of the HLP meeting were requested to consider electing one of the Member States of the Region to serve on the PCC for a three-year term of office from 1 January 2014. The attached working paper and report of the PCC were submitted to the HLP Meeting who made the following recommendation: Action by Member States (1) To recommend to the Sixty-sixth Regional Committee the nomination of Timor-Leste from the South-East Asia Region as a member of the PCC in place of Bhutan, whose term expires on 31 December 2013. The Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee is requested to consider and note the report of the PCC Meeting and to make a decision on the recommendation of the HLP Meeting.

Provisional Agenda.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/1 Rev.3 - Agenda
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-22 )
RC66-14 Agenda Item 4.7.2 Intensification of Routine Immunization.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/14 - Progress reports on selected regional committee resolutions: 2012: year of intensification of routine immunization in the South-East Asia region: framework for increasing and sustaining coverage (SEA/RC64/R3)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-19 )
Abstract

The annual birth cohort in the WHO South-East Asia Region is estimated at about 40 million. In 2011 the regional diphtheria–tetanus–pertussis (DTP3) coverage was only 75%, and WHO estimates that about 9 million children miss out on the most basic package of immunization. Recognizing this, the Sixty-fourth Session of the WHO South-East Asia Regional Committee adopted resolution SEA/RC64/R3 declaring 2012 as the Year of Intensification of Routine Immunization. Pursuant to that resolution, all Member States developed plans of action focusing on high-risk or hard-to-reach areas and populations for intensified efforts to strengthen immunization services and systems in countries. Intensification efforts include a wide range of activities, from training to build capacity of the health workforce to hiring more staff, improving advocacy and communication on immunization, enhancing community participation, partnership-building, better follow-up and tracking of infants for vaccination and, in some cases, supplementary immunization activities to reach those children that may have missed out on routine services. Member States have made progress, albeit some more than others. However, there are still several countries where efforts must continue in order to reach those that are still not receiving routine services, and to sustain the gains made thus far. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To review multi-year national plans of action for immunization to improve focus on specific strategies to reach the hard-to-reach areas or pockets of population in otherwise high coverage areas. (2) To support the implementation of high-quality surveillance for vaccine-preventable diseases. (1) To ensure the availability of national resources necessary for a sustainable immunization programme, while making every effort to mobiize additional resources from donors. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To work with partners to explore mechanisms to obtain vaccines at the best prices possible, particularly for those small countries who do not require bulk purchase. (2) To provide technical support to countries in the development of their multi-year routine immunization plans of action, monitoring and evaluation activities. (3) To provide technical support to countries for the development of high-quality vaccine-preventable disease surveillance. The working paper and HLP meeting recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

RC66-13 Agenda 4.7.1 Challenges in polio eradication.pdf.jpg
SEA/RC66/13 - Progress reports on selected regional committee resolutions: challenges in polio eradication (SEA/RC60/R8)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2013-07-19 )
Abstract

Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the WHO South-East Asia Region. This paper presents an update on the progress towards, and challenges to, polio eradication. The Region has made tremendous progress towards polio eradication in the past year. In January 2013, the South-East Asia Region marked two polio-free years – its longest polio-free period. The last wild poliovirus case in the Region was reported from India on 13 January 2011. The Region is currently on track for polio-free certification in February 2014, three years after the last reported case. Successes and lessons learnt in building a highly sensitive surveillance network for polio eradication have been expanded to include strengthening surveillance for other vaccine-preventable diseases and monitoring of routine immunization activities. Despite the tremendous progress made towards polio eradication, the Region remains at risk to importation of polioviruses as long as they are circulating anywhere in the world. Risk mitigation activities are critical to monitoring and maintaining regional gains in polio eradication, which include high-quality sensitive acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance and high population immunity against polio through routine immunization. Polio eradication requires sustained funding; a substantial proportion is currently being met through external funding. Member States can help the eradication effort by committing funds for vaccine-preventable disease surveillance, outbreak response and strengthening routine immunization service delivery. As the Region approaches polio-free certification in early 2014, its focus will need to shift to post-polio eradication activities, which include implementation of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013–2018 and legacy planning for the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI). The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting held in the Regional Office in New Delhi from 1 to 3 July 2013 reviewed the attached working paper and made the following recommendations: Actions by Member States (1) To maintain high population immunity through strengthening routine immunization and supplementary immunization, as appropriate, based on periodic risk assessment. (2) To ensure that all children, including migrants, the unreached, marginalized and underserved, also receive the vaccine. (3) To strengthen surveillance for early detection of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). (4) To develop plans of action for the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018. (5) To review and strengthen national policy on vaccination for travellers to mass gatherings and to and from polio-endemic countries and areas with active polio transmission. Actions by WHO-SEARO (1) To monitor periodically the risk status of Member States and provide advice on the most appropriate response. (2) To provide technical support and resource mobilization for development of country-specific plans of action for the polio endgame, including the switch to bOPV and introduction of IPV. (3) To promote technology transfer to the extent possible for vaccine development in vaccine-developing countries in the Region. The working paper and the HLP Meeting recommendations are submitted to the Sixty-sixth Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

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