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Collection's Items (Sorted by Date de dépôt in Descendant order): 1 to 20 of 24
HLP Programme.pdf.jpg
Programme (Venue: Conference Hall)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
HLP List of Participants.pdf.jpg
Provisional list of participants
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-28 )
HLP Agenda item 7.3 - Capacity building on Glob Hlth-TS-NNK 24 Jun 2010-edited.pdf.jpg
Capacity building for member states on global health
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-24 )
Résumés

The term - “global health” is rapidly replacing its commonly used form i.e, “international health”. This change has emerged as part of the larger political and historical process. The term “global health” has been used since the early days of establishment of the World Health Organization in the late 1940s. In general, it implies the situation where the health needs of the people of the whole planet are responded to, above the concerns of particular nations. A joint collaboration among the Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia, and the ThaiHealth Global Link Initiative Program, (TGLIP) resulted in organizing the First Regional Training Course on Global Health in May 2010. The first module – an introductory course on global health - organized from 1-5 May 2010 in Nakhon Pathon, Thailand was attended by participants from seven countries of the South-East Asia Region, who were selected from among the delegates attending the Sixty-third World Health Assembly. It was followed by the second module of practical experience and learning through attendance at the Sixty-third World Health Assembly from 17-21 May 2010 in Geneva. A wrap-up session- the third module - was conducted on 22 May 2010 in Geneva. It is envisaged to organize regional training courses on global health conducted in Member States on a rotation basis. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 7.2 - Regional_Strategy_on_HIS _FINAL.pdf.jpg
Regional strategy on health information systems
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-24 )
Résumés

Public health decision-making is critically dependent on the timely availability of sound data. The role of the health information system is to collect, analyse and disseminate such data. Health information systems in countries of the WHO South-East Asia (SEA) Region are at various stages of development and there are several global initiatives, networks, programmes and projects that have been launched by development partners to assist Member States in health information system development. The WHO Regional Office for the South-East Asia took the initiative to develop a strategic framework to guide countries in strengthening and reorienting their national health information systems. After a series of country consultations a 10-Point Regional Strategy for Strengthening Health Information Systems was developed in 2005. The strategy was endorsed at the fifty-ninth session of the Regional Committee in August 2006. All countries have reviewed their national health information systems and taken action to align them with the regional strategic framework. Since there are many new developments in the field of health information and information communication technology, one of the Member States has suggested including “Regional Strategy on Health Information Systems” as an agenda item for the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 7.1 - Regional Strategy on Universal health coverage.pdf.jpg
Regional strategy on universal health coverage
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-25 )
Résumés

There has been strong and consistent commitment to improving equity in health through universal coverage in the Region as well as global level from WHO and Member States. An overall financing strategy towards achieving this goal has been developed for the Asia-Pacific Region jointly by South-East Asia Region Office and Western-Pacific Region Office. Further, these regional priorities will be a focus of the forthcoming 2010 World Health Report, Financing for universal coverage. Key challenges to financing for universal coverage in the Region are high and potentially impoverishing out-of-pocket spending on health; a large and poor informal sector that is most vulnerable to the high cost of access to care; a large and mostly unregulated private sector that dominates provision of care; and an increasing burden of non-communicable disease requiring high-cost individual care. There are three choices in progress towards universal coverage that health financing reform needs to consider: priority population to be reached with a chosen benefit package at a feasible public subsidy. A practical approach to shift from out-of-pocket payments towards equity and universal coverage is a step-by-step move, first to an intermediate stage of a mix of community initiatives to protect the informal sector and social insurance for the formal sector with general government revenues focusing on public health and the poor; and, a next stage that consolidates community and social insurance into national level social protection schemes with continued public investment in public health and target population. In-depth technical assessments of the potential of this approach to sustainable financing for universal coverage in Member States is recommended to formulate a strategy for the Region to be considered by the Sixty-fourth Regional Committee in 2011 for further action. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 6.2 - PCC-Inf Doc.pdf.jpg
Special Programmes : UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction: Policy and Coordination Committee (PCC) – report on attendance at PCC in 2010 and nomination of a member in place of Indonesia whose term expires on 31 December 2010
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-26 )
Résumés

The Twenty-third Meeting of the Policy and Coordination Committee of the UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme for Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (“the Programme"), was held in Geneva, Switzerland on 24-25 June 2010. The attached document is a brief report on the deliberations of the meeting.

HLP Agenda item 6.2 - PCC.pdf.jpg
Special programmes : UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank special programme of research, development and research training in human reproduction: policy and coordination committee (PCC) – report on attendance at PCC in 2010 and nomination of a member in place of Indonesia whose term expires on 31 December 2010
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

The Policy and Coordination Committee (PCC) acts as the governing body of the Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. The last PCC Meeting was held from 24 to 25 June 2010 in Geneva, Switzerland. The report on attendance at this meeting is contained in the working paper. At present, there are three Member states from the South-East Asia Region (Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Thailand) that are members of PCC. Since the term of office of Indonesia ends on 31 December 2010, the HLP meeting may consider recommending, in this session, one of the Member States of the Region to serve on the PCC for a three-year term of office from 1 January 2011. The recommendation of the HLP meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration

HLP Agenda item 6.1 - JCB _Dr Chusak Amendments_.pdf.jpg
Special Programmes : UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme of Research and Training in Tropical Diseases: Joint Coordinating Board (JCB) – Report on attendance at JCB in 2010 and nomination of a member in place of Bhutan whose term expires on 31 December 2010
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-22 )
Résumés

The Joint Coordinating Board (JCB) of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases Research (TDR) acts as the governing body of the Special Programme and is responsible for its overall policy and strategy. This paper describes the background and composition of the JCB TDR and the action to be taken by the Regional Committee. Since the term of office of Bhutan ends on 31 December 2010, the HLP Meeting may consider electing, in this session, one of the Member States of the Region to serve on the JCB for a four-year term of office from 1 January 2011. The recommendation of the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.5 - Prevention and control of NCDs.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected Regional Committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : Scaling up prevention and control of chronic noncommunicable diseases in the South-East Asia Region (SEA/RC60/R4)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

WHO action in the area of prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in the South-East Asia (SEA) Region is guided by the Regional Framework for Prevention and Control of NCDs. The Framework was formulated in close collaboration with Member States and endorsed by the health secretaries of Member States of the Region at their 11th Meeting in 2006. The WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia, vide its resolution on Scaling up Prevention and Control of Chronic Noncommunicable Disease (NCDs) in the South-East Asia Region (SEA/RC60/R4) further deliberated on and endorsed the Regional Framework and requested the Regional Director to report to the Sixty-third session of the Regional Committee in 2010 on the progress achieved in its implementation. The Regional Framework aims at facilitating the process of developing, updating and implementing national policies, plans and programmes for integrated prevention and control of major NCDs including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic pulmonary diseases and diabetes. It is based on public health principles and on national, regional and global consensus on policy and technical actions for prevention and control of NCDs and their primary risk factors. The attached working paper reflects on the health and socio-economic impact of NCDs in the Region. It reports on actions taken by Member States and by the WHO Secretariat, since the adoption of the Framework, to scale up prevention and control of NCDs. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/20) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.4 - Challenges in polio eradiction.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected Regional Committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : challenges in polio eradication (SEA/RC60/R8)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. In the first four months of 2010’, 20 polio cases were detected in India with three subtype 1 poliovirus (P1) and 17 subtype 3 poliovirus (P3) cases. This paper presents an update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication. No P1 case has been detected in UP and Bihar in 2010. The three P1 cases reported this year are from Jammu & Kashmir, Maharashtra and West Bengal. In 2009, 80 cases of type 1 wild polio virus were detected in India. Intense efforts reduced the circulation of imported type1 poliovirus in and around western UP. The most affected districts either did not sustain transmission or stopped transmission after 2-7 months. Even though at the beginning of 2009 a reduction in the transmission of P3 cases was observed, the latter half of 2009 witnessed P3 transmission in the endemic areas of western UP and central Bihar. Transmission was more intense in these areas because of fewer type 3 vaccine rounds. The final P3 case count for India in 2009 was 662. There are several challenges to the eradication of polio in the Region. The principal challenge in India is overcoming suboptimal vaccine efficacy in the districts of western UP which continues to be polio endemic. The key challenge here is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. While some efforts have been made by the government, these are at present not of sufficient scale to have an impact. More needs to be done in this area. In non-endemic areas, migrants have been playing an important role in the spread of WPV1 as they are highly mobile, more likely to be missed and need special efforts of surveillance and supplementary immunization activity (SIA) operations. The P1 case detected in Nepal in February in a district adjoining Bihar and the current P1 outbreak in Tajikistan epidemiologically linked to India indicate that the key challenge for other countries in the Region and beyond is to protect their polio-free status by preventing re-infection. A strong routine immunization programme that can deliver and maintain OPV3 coverage greater than 80% in all districts in all countries will help prevent re-infection. Additionally, all polio-free countries must conduct periodic risk assessment to determine the level of risk of re-infection and spread, and to decide whether or not polio immunization campaigns will be required to boost population immunity.

HLP Agenda item 5.3 - SEAR efforts on measles elimination.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected Regional Committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : South-East Asia regional efforts on measles elimination (SEA/RC62/R3)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

The regional consultation on measles held in SEARO in August 2009, agreed that measles elimination was technically, biologically and programmatically feasible. The consultation proposed setting a regional goal to eliminate measles by 2020 to the sixty-second session of the Regional Committee in Kathmandu in September 2009. The Regional Committee decided that setting a regional measles elimination goal would be considered at its sixty-third session in 2010. The Regional Committee adopted a resolution requesting several actions including a “report to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee on the status of global measles elimination goals and outcome of activities in the South-East Asia Region”. The current global goal is 90% reduction of mortality due to measles by 2010 or earlier compared to mortality in 2000. Following implementation of various strategies, measles mortality has been reduced globally by 78% from an estimated 733,000 in 2000 to 164,000 in 2008. WHO has estimated that between 2000 and 2008 the annual number of measles deaths in the SEA Region decreased by 46% (from 234 000 to 126 000). However, all countries in the Region except India have reached or exceeded the 2010 goal of 90% reduction in measles mortality. The WHO Region of the Americas achieved measles elimination in 2002. The Eastern Mediterranean, European, Western Pacific and African regions have set measles elimination goals. Measles eradication is defined as the worldwide interruption of measles transmission; the simultaneous elimination of measles in all WHO regions would equate to global eradication. The 126th session of the Executive Board in January 2010 and the sixty-third World Health Assembly in May 2010 reviewed a report on “Global Eradication of measles” prepared by the Secretariat. This paper summarizes requirements to be met before setting a goal for measles eradication, interim milestones towards global eradication of measles, situation analysis of measles control and progress towards measles elimination in Member States of the Region and potential challenges in achieving measles elimination in the Region. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/18) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.2 - Nutrition and Food Safety.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : nutrition and food safety in the South-East Asia Region (SEA/RC60/R3)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-22 )
Résumés

The working paper on nutrition and food safety in the South-east Asia Region provides a brief overview of the nutrition and food safety situation in Member States of the South-East Asia (SEA) Region. It indicates that while overall food consumption has increased and nutrition indicators have shown improvement, the global economic crisis and climate change may lead to food insecurity and increase in the number of malnourished individuals. The paper describes some of the key nutrition and food safety indicators in the Region. Activities in nutrition and food safety undertaken during the reporting period and proposed activities to be conducted in the biennium are also tabulated. It concludes by identifying a range of supportive actions from Member States with regard to the promotion of nutrition and food safety in the SEA Region: to increase political commitment in order to promote national nutrition and food safety programmes; to mainstream nutrition and food safety issues into all national health policies and strategies and ensure the implementation of global strategies on infant and young child feeding, food safety, diet, physical activity and health; to strengthen nutrition surveillance systems and implement the WHO Child Growth Standards and Growth References through their full integration into child and adolescent health programmes; to develop and maintain sustainable and comprehensive preventive measures for reducing the burden of foodborne diseases encompassing the complete food-production chain from farm to consumption; to enable active and appropriate participation of national authorities in activities of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, INFOSAN and other international networks; and to strengthen the laboratory capacity for investigating and reporting on foodborne diseases outbreaks. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/17) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.1 - Collaboration withn the UN system.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : collaboration within the un system and with other international agencies and partnerships
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

The recognition of health as a key element for sustainable development and global security has resulted in a substantial increase in global resources for health in recent years. At the same time, the diversity and number of health actors have also increased significantly, with private and non-state actors contributing significant resources to development assistance for health. With this proliferation of actors in health, WHO, particularly at country level must coordinate its work, through effective partnerships, not only with government authorities but also with other United Nations (UN) agencies, donors, and civil society organizations, in order to ensure alignment of health strategies and goals and improve health development outcomes at country level. The attached paper provides an overview of WHO’s collaboration within the UN system and with other international agencies and partnerships over the last year. It reflects the Organization’s commitment to UN reform, as well as its efforts in collaborating with a diverse and complementary array of partners to enhance the effectiveness of the global health community in accelerating the achievement of the internationally-agreed health development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/16) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 4.1 - Key issues and challenges of WHA63, EB126 & 127.pdf.jpg
Governing bodies : key issues and challenges arising out of the sixty-third World Health Assembly and the 126th and 127th sessions of the WHO Executive Board
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-24 )
Résumés

The attached working paper highlights the most significant and relevant decisions and resolutions emanating from the Sixty-third World Health Assembly (held from 17-21 May 2010) as well as the 126th and 127th sessions of the Executive Board (held from 18-23 January 2010 and on 22 May 2010 respectively). These decisions and resolutions are particularly relevant to the Member States of the WHO South-East Asia (SEA) Region, have obvious and immediate implications for them, and would merit follow-up action by both Member States as well as WHO at the Regional Office and country office levels. The background of the selected decisions/resolutions, highlights from the main operative paragraphs of these selected decisions/resolutions, as well as the regional implications of each decision and/or resolution, as applicable, and actions proposed for Member States and WHO have been presented. The attached working paper (SEA/RC63/14) is submitted for consideration by the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting, with particular reference to the regional implications and actions proposed to be taken towards implementation of the recommendations contained in the selected decisions/resolutions. The HLP meeting may wish to consider the decisions/resolutions as relevant (details of these resolutions are provided in the annex to this paper). The views and recommendations of the HLP meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for review and noting, as appropriate.

HLP Agenda item 3 -  Selection of a subject for TD.pdf.jpg
Technical discussions: selection of a subject for the technical discussions to be held prior to the sixty-fourth session of the regional committee
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

The attached document SEA/RC63/7 lists the subjects of the Technical Discussions held since 1998 in conjunction with the respective sessions of the Regional Committee. It also provides a list of proposed subjects for the Technical Discussions to be held prior to the Sixty-fourth session of the Regional Committee in 2011. The High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting is requested to review the proposed subjects for the Technical Discussions and select an appropriate subject to be recommended to the Regional Committee for its consideration at its Sixty-third Session.

SEA-PDM-18.pdf.jpg
High-level preparatory (HLP) meeting for the sixty-third session of the WHO regional committee for South-East Asia, WHO/SEARO, New Delhi, 28 June-1 July 2010
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia. ( 2010 )
Résumés

This publication is the report of the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for the Sixty-third Session of the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia. Delegates from Member States in the Region reviewed the working papers to be discussed at the Sixty-third Session of the WHO Regional Committee to be held in September 2010. During the meeting, the Regional Office staff members concerned made brief presentations and responded to issues considered during the discussions. For each of the agenda items, the HLP meeting made observations and recommendations for consideration by the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee

SEA-PDM-18.pdf.jpg
High-level preparatory (HLP) meeting for the sixty-third session of the WHO regional committee for South-East Asia, WHO/SEARO, New Delhi, 28 June-1 July 2010
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia. ( 2010 )
Résumés

This publication is the report of the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for the Sixty-third Session of the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia. Delegates from Member States in the Region reviewed the working papers to be discussed at the Sixty-third Session of the WHO Regional Committee to be held in September 2010. During the meeting, the Regional Office staff members concerned made brief presentations and responded to issues considered during the discussions. For each of the agenda items, the HLP meeting made observations and recommendations for consideration by the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee

HLP Agenda item 2.6 - Accelerating the achiev MDG.pdf.jpg
Accelerating the achievement of MDG 5: Addressing inequity in maternal and neonatal health
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

Improving maternal and neonatal health continues to be the major challenge for many countries in the WHO South-East Asia (SEA) Region. Overcoming the challenge would require an effective and efficient health-care system that allows all women to plan for their pregnancy and to get skilled care during antenatal, childbirth and postnatal periods, as well as neonatal care, and that these are backed up by referral services. Providing such healthcare services is an important element of implementing human rights that governments are obliged to provide for all their citizens without discrimination. Countries in the SEA Region contribute to about 27% of the global population; however, they contribute to approximately 33% of the global maternal and neonatal deaths. In absolute numbers, the Region contributed to more than 170 000 maternal deaths, 1 million still-births and more than 1.3 million neonatal deaths in 2008. The health inequities across and within countries are the major issues in the Region. The attached paper highlights the inequities among and within countries in accessing skilled care at birth and in utilization of modern family planning methods. Among the causes of inequity in maternal and neonatal health (MNH) care, a few of the key issues that are emphasized are: (i) inadequate commitment and low budget allocation for the MNH programme at national and subnational levels; (ii) social and cultural barriers in accessing MNH care; and (iii) inadequate quality of MNH care. The recommendations proposed to address the inequities in MNH care are: (i) strengthen commitment and ensure adequate budget allocation for the MNH programme; (ii) improve leadership and management of the MNH programme at all levels; (iii) ensure women and community empowerment for MNH care and community-based actions; (iv) forge multisectoral collaboration/partnership in achieving universal access for MNH/reproductive health; and (v) facilitate exchange of information and experience within and among countries. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/13) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 2.5 - Healthy ageing.pdf.jpg
Strategic framework on healthy ageing in the Region
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-22 )
Résumés

The working paper provides a brief overview of the situation with regard to healthy ageing in the Member States of the WHO South-East Asia (SEA) Region. It indicates the gradual increase in the proportion of population aged 60 years and more in most countries of the Region, and how this increase will affect the social and health services in Member States. The working paper then mentions the general features and components of the regional strategic framework on healthy ageing in the Region. It concludes by identifying a range of supportive actions from Member States with regard to healthy ageing in the Region: to increase political commitment for the promotion of healthy ageing; to develop or review the current interventions addressing the ageing issue and relate this to the regional strategic framework on healthy ageing; to scale up activities for establishing a national policy on ageing; to strengthen the existing national authority responsible for extending support to healthy ageing; and to continue to support the existing mechanisms for collaboration with other sectors of the government and interested stakeholders involved in healthy ageing-related interventions. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/12) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 2.4 - Prevention & cont of antimicrobial resis.pdf.jpg
Prevention and containment of antimicrobial resistance
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Résumés

During the past six decades antimicrobial agents have played a critical role in reducing the burden of communicable diseases all over the world. The emergence of resistance and its rapid spread is negating the impact of these drugs, obstructing progress towards achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for HIV, TB and malaria and hindering effective application of modern technologies in mitigating human misery. While appearance of resistance is a continuous phenomenon in microorganism, its amplification and spread is through an array of practices conducted by human beings. Improper utilization of antimicrobial agents especially in high disease-burden settings and for non-therapeutic use as in the veterinary sector result in strong selection pressure that allows the resistant strain to grow and rapidly replace the susceptible isolates. Diseases due to resistant organisms take longer to heal, require expensive and at times toxic drugs for longer periods, often making the disease untreatable. The resistant organisms can also move across countries through travel and trade. In that sense, antimicrobial resistance is a global challenge requiring concerted efforts at national and international levels to preserve the available antimicrobial agents. This is possible through treatment policies such as combination therapy, rational prescription, patient adherence, strong regulatory mechanism and educational activities, along with an efficient surveillance system that monitors the emergence and spread of resistance, as well as the utilization of antimicrobial agents. To facilitate this activity at country level, WHO has developed a strategy that is simple, practical and easy to scale-up. The regional strategy aims to give particular attention to interventions involving the introduction of legislation and policies governing the use of antimicrobial agents, establishing laboratory-based networks for surveillance of resistance and ensuring the rational use of these drugs at all levels of health-care settings. The effective implementation of this strategy by various national disease control programmes will lead to reduction in the morbidity and mortality due to antimicrobial-resistant infection, and preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents in the treatment and prevention of microbial infections. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/11) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

Collection's Items (Sorted by Date de dépôt in Descendant order): 1 to 20 of 24