HLP 2009 Collection home page View Statistics

Browse
Subscribe to this collection to receive daily e-mail notification of new additions RSS Feed RSS Feed RSS Feed
Collection's Items (Sorted by Submit Date in Descending order): 1 to 20 of 25
HLP Agenda item 7.2 - Protecting heatlh facilities.pdf.jpg
Agenda items to be discussed in health ministers’ meeting : protecting health facilities from emergencies : developing safer healthcare facilities.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-25 )
Abstract

As the World Health Day 2009 theme and the Global Campaign of the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction are on the same topic of keeping health facilities safe in emergencies; the need for further discussions can help take this public health issue forward. This is in line with the vulnerability of the Region to various natural and human- generated emergencies. Considering that health facilities and their safety from hazards require looking at three main factors: structural, non-structural and functional, it requires several disciplines to be involved. Addressing the issue also involves specific challenges to be tackled such as: multisectoral engagement; community involvement; political will; integration of risk-reduction measures into development projects; and increasing awareness, among others. Global, regional and country efforts have produced positive results and these need to be taken to the next level in terms of coverage, type of facilities, methodologies to be applied and strategies to be adopted. Being one of the main benchmarks of the SEAR Region for emergency preparedness and response, Member states have taken this issue forward. The Regional Consultation on Keeping Health Facilities Safe from Disasters, held last in April 2008, outlined several recommendations and countries have taken steps in moving in the recommended direction. This paper outlines these matters and is presented for discussion by the High-level Preparatory (HLP) meeting.

HLP Programme.pdf.jpg
Programme.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-30 )
HLP List of Participants- Rev.01.pdf.jpg
Provisional list of participants.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-30 )
HLP Agenda item 8 - Measles.pdf.jpg
Measles.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-26 )
Abstract

The global goal for measles control is reducing measles mortality by 90% in 2010 in comparison to 2000. Nevertheless, the Americas (2002), Eastern Mediterranean (2010), Europe (2012) and Western Pacific regions (2012) have set a measles elimination goal. The African Region has set a pre-elimination goal of reducing measles mortality by 98% in 2012 compared to 2000 estimates. In the South-East Asia Region which has a measles morality reduction goal, four Member States are implementing the strategies for measles elimination and all Member States except India have reached an advanced stage of measles mortality reduction. With the success in the Americas and progress in three regions with an elimination goal, there is interest in exploring the feasibility of setting a global measles elimination goal. Accordingly, the 125th Session of the WHO Executive Board directed the WHO Secretariat to submit a report on the “feasibility of global elimination of measles” to the 126th Executive Board in January 2010. In line with this, SEARO will organize a regional consultation from 25-27 August 2009 to consider the feasibility of a regional measles elimination goal. This paper presents an update on the progress in achieving the goal of measles mortality reduction in the Region and important considerations in establishing a measles elimination goal. The considerations for setting the elimination goal include achieving high and sustainable routine immunization coverage, developing a highly sensitive surveillance system, availability of funding, ensuring vaccine supply of assured quality, considering lessons from polio eradication and competing priorities, and developing political will and support from society. This paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) meeting for its consideration and to seek advice regarding the next steps on the “feasibility of measles elimination goal”.

HLP Agenda item 7.3 - Impact of global financial crisis.pdf.jpg
Agenda items to be discussed in health ministers’ meeting : impact of global financial crisis in health.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-08 )
Abstract

The current global financial and economic crises have important implications for health in Member States of the South-East Asia Region. Experience with similar events in the past – notably the Asian crisis in 1997 – indicate that the health status of the poor, especially of women and children, is particularly vulnerable, needing reiterated government priority to health. The pathways in which the crises could impact health work at both the micro and the macro levels in countries. Increased unemployment and poverty at household level constrains financial access to care in a Region where out-of-pocket health expenditures are already exceptionally high and impoverishing. While there is greater reliance on subsidized public services, budgetary capacity to even maintain the share of health spending is difficult in periods of economic slowdown. Countries that have been most successful in protecting the poor and vulnerable are those where governments have been committed to reform and have used a crisis as an opportunity to accelerate long-term health systems restructuring toward universal coverage. Thailand, during the Asian crisis, is a case in point and, in fact, is also the only country in the Region to safeguard the health budget during the current crises through legislative action. Little is available by way of robust evidence at this stage and the crises continue to unfold. Recovery is not predicted before next year and then too it is expected to be slow. As requested at a regional consultation on the subject, the WHO Regional Office for the South-East Asia Region is setting up a health intelligence unit to monitor the crises and interpret health implications for countries. Further, rapid assessments on household impact are being conducted in three countries to support strategic action targeted at protecting the poor and vulnerable and, possibly, stemming a spill-over to social unrest. Both these efforts are in response to country requests for assistance in preventing a health systems crisis and, in fact, use the crises as an opportunity to restructure health systems towards social protection for universal coverage. The views and recommendations of the HLP Meeting on this agenda item will be submitted to the Twenty-seventh Meeting of Ministers of Health for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 7.1 - Review of New Delhi Declaration.pdf.jpg
Agenda items to be discussed in health ministers’ meeting : review of New Delhi declaration/follow-up actions on the decisions and recommendations of the twenty-sixth meeting of ministers of health.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-26 )
Abstract

The document highlights the follow-up initiated on recommendations/action points in respect of the following three agenda items deliberated at the Twenty-sixth Meeting of Ministers of Health of Member countries of the WHO South-East Asia Region, held in New Delhi, India, 8-9 September 2008: I. Review of New Delhi Declaration on the impacts of climate change and health; II. Climate change and health; and III. Millennium Development Goals. The document is submitted to the High-level Preparatory Meeting (HLP) for its consideration before submission to the forthcoming Twenty-seventh Meeting of Ministers of Health scheduled in Kathmandu, Nepal on 7-8 September 2009.

HLP Agenda item 6.2 - PCC-Rev.1.pdf.jpg
UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/WORLD BANK special programme for research, development and research training in human reproduction: policy and coordination committee (PCC) : report on attendance at PCC in 2009 and nomination of a member in place of Myanmar whose term expires on 31 December 2009.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-25 )
Abstract

The Policy and Coordination Committee (PCC) acts as the governing body of the Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. The last PCC meeting was held from 18 to 19 June 2009 in Geneva, Switzerland. Its report is being presented to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting. At present, there are three Member states from the South-East Asia Region (Indonesia, Myanmar and Sri Lanka) that are members of the PCC. Since the term of office of Myanmar ends on 31 December 2009, the HLP Meeting may consider electing, in this session, one of the Member States of the Region to serve on the PCC for a three-year term of office from 1 January 2010. The recommendation of the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 6.2 - PCC-INF DOC.pdf.jpg
UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank special programme for research, development and research training in human reproduction : policy and coordination committee (PCC) : report on attendance at PCC in 2009 and nomination of a member in place of Myanmar whose term expires on 31 December 2009.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-30 )
Abstract

The Twenty-second Meeting of the Policy and Coordination Committee of the UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme for Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (“the Programme"), was held in Geneva, Switzerland on 18-19 June 2009. The attached document is a brief report on the deliberations of the meeting.

HLP Agenda item 6.1 - JCB INF DOC.pdf.jpg
UNDP/World Bank/WHO special programme for research and training in tropical diseases: joint coordinating board (JCB) – report on attendance at JCB in 2009 and nomination of a member in place of Thailand whose term expires on 31 December 2009
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-25 )
Abstract

Draft report on the attendance of JCB members at the Thirty-second session of the Joint Coordinating Board (JCB), 15-17 June 2009, Geneva. The draft report is submitted to HLP Meeting for noting.

HLP Agenda item 6.1 - JCB _Dr Chusak Amendments_.pdf.jpg
UNDP/World Bank/WHO special programme for research and training in tropical diseases: joint coordinating board (JCB) – report on attendance at JCB in 2009 and nomination of a member in place of Thailand whose term expires on 31 December 2009.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-25 )
Abstract

The Joint Coordinating Board (JCB) of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases Research (TDR) acts as the governing body of the Special Programme and is responsible for its overall policy and strategy. This paper describes the background and composition of the JCB TDR and the action to be taken by the Regional Committee. It also includes a brief report on the Thirty-second session of the JCB held in Geneva, from 15 to 17 June 2009. Since the term of office of Thailand ends on 31 December 2009, the HLP Meeting may consider electing, in this session, one of the Member States of the Region to serve on the JCB for a four-year term of office from 1 January 2010. The recommendation of the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.7 - Pandemic influenza preparedness.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: pandemic influenza preparedness: sharing of influenza viruses and access to vaccines and other benefits.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-08 )
Abstract

Viruses have been freely shared through WHO Collaborating Centres on Influenza for the purpose of risk assessment and vaccine production. In 2007 Indonesia proposed that sharing of H5N1 avian influenza viruses should be tied to benefits of affordable and available vaccine. This led to a halt in the practice of freely sharing influenza viruses. A number of unsuccessful attempts have been made to resolve this impasse. The last inter-governmental meeting (IGM) was convened before the World Health Assembly, on 16-17, May 2009 in Geneva. The meeting ended with a consensus on most issues, but left datasharing between laboratories and intellectual property rights on viruses unresolved. The main areas of progress have been in consolidating the system, structure and mechanisms of virus sharing and include the establishment of a traceability mechanism in January 2008 to track all shared H5N1 viruses; an interim system providing full disclosure of information on transfer and movement of virus; establishment of an advisory mechanism by the WHO Director-General to monitor the functioning of the NIC and WHO Collaborating Centres; establishment of an international stockpile of vaccines for H5N1 funded by the Gates Foundation and strengthening surveillance at animal-human interface through collaboration between WHO, FAO, UNICEF and OIE. In addition, two working groups on Standard Material Transfer Agreement (SMTA) and terms of reference for WHO CCs and WHO H5N1 Reference labs were established. The specific policyrelated technical issues are: specific clauses of IHR (2005) may need to be modified to ensure compliance with virus sharing; vaccine sharing mechanisms and agreements need to be developed between Member States; benefits must be concrete and, clear and provided to developing countries, especially affected countries; do countries have sovereign right over their biological resources?; epidemiologic data related to influenza burden (both seasonal and novel pandemic influenza) are needed to justify expansion of influenza vaccine production. In addition, there is a need to explore innovative mechanisms for licensing existing or future intellectual property rights and of platforms to promote access to vaccine technology by developing countries and specific financing and funding mechanisms that could be made available to developing countries to purchase vaccine and to ensure adequate funding for needed activities such as rapid vaccine deployment. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.6 - Harmful use of alcohol.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : strategies to reduce harmful use of alcohol.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-09 )
Abstract

The WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia, vide resolution SEA/RC59/R8, requested the Regional Office to provide technical support to Member States in building and strengthening programmes on prevention of harm from alcohol use. The basis for the prevention of alcohol-related harm in the context of the South-East Asia Region should not only be disease prevention but reduction of poverty, disempowerment, violence, prevention of injuries and improvement of well-being and social capital. Programmes should address local patterns of alcohol consumption and attitudes of the communities. Another issue of concern is the consumption of alcohol among women, which is currently quite low, but is gradually increasing. Illicit alcohol production and consumption is also of concern in the Region. Legislation and policy measures alone cannot fully address the reduction of harm related to alcohol use in the Region. Thus, community empowerment programmes become important as a strategy to reduce harm from alcohol use in the community. Initiatives to reduce harm from alcohol use in the Region have to take into account all the above factors. A single solution to this problem does not exist in the context of the Region. Hence, care should be taken to ensure that interventions are tailored to the countries and communities they are addressed to. The strategies proposed by the Regional Office to reduce the harmful use of alcohol include: (a) Support to Member States for developing alcohol-related policy; (b) Regional contribution to the draft document “Towards a Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Use of Alcohol”; and (c) Community action to reduce harm from alcohol use, based on evidence from the Region. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.5 - Combating counterfeit medical products.pdf.jpg
Combating counterfeit medical products.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-23 )
Abstract

The involvement of WHO in combating counterfeit medicines is based on its role in public health; counterfeit medicines would affect the health-care system and lead to adverse health effects. Counterfeit medicines also involve many other areas such as commerce, law enforcement and intellectual property rights, which make the issue complex. WHO has been engaged in combating counterfeit medicine since 1985, but this paper discusses activities since 2008. Following the World Health Assembly discussions on the topic in 2008, the WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia discussed the issue and developed a clear definition of counterfeit medical products which clearly excluded intellectual property disputes. During the discussions at the Executive Board in Geneva in January 2009, there were certain extraneous incidents which sought to link intellectual property rights to counterfeit products. This resulted in a request for further information to be presented at the 2009 World Health Assembly. The issue was however, not taken up at the World Health Assembly due to the shortened session. There are many issues that are still unresolved and this paper poses questions that need to be dealt with by Member States before the World Health Assembly in 2010. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.4 - Public health innovation.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: public health, innovation and intellectual property.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-22 )
Abstract

After intensive negotiations over a two-year period, the World Health Assembly in May 2008 adopted resolution WHA61.21 on public health, innovation and intellectual property together with the global strategy and plan of action (GSPOA). Several outstanding issues were finalized and adopted during the Sixty-second World Health Assembly in May 2009. The GSPOA aims to promote new thinking on innovation and access to medicines, and to enhance needs-based research and development (R&D) relevant to diseases that mainly affect developing countries. The scope of the GSPOA however is vast; thus, there may be a need for prioritization at national and regional levels. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.3 - Strengthening Health Workforce.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: strengthening the health workforce in South-East Asia.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-05-08 )
Abstract

This document highlights the progress made in the South-East Asia Region following the adoption of resolution SEA/RC59/R6 on strengthening the health workforce in South-East Asia by the Regional Committee for South-East Asia in Dhaka, Bangladesh in September 2006. Many of the activities have been specified in the South-East Asia Regional Strategic Plan for Human Resource Development which has been finalized following endorsement by the Fifty-ninth session of the Regional Committee. The overall goal was ensuring equitable access to effective health services through an adequate and balanced distribution of sufficient, competent, and highly motivated health workforce. The Committee also requested the Regional Director to facilitate several actions in relation to regional health workforce development. The progress made by the Region in this regard is mentioned in detail in the document. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.2 - Polio Eradication.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-17 )
Abstract

Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. In the first four months of 2009*, 40 polio cases were detected in India with 14 subtype 1 poliovirus (P1) and 26 subtype 3 poliovirus (P3) cases. This paper presents an update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication. At the start of 2008 a reduction in the transmission of P1 cases, particularly in western Uttar Pradesh (UP) was seen which, however, was offset by re-importation from Bihar in the later half of the year, resulting in 62 subtype P1 cases. Rapid and large-scale mop-up immunizations prevented P1 importation into neighbouring states. The subtype P3 outbreak of 2007 was rapidly controlled with massive outbreak response and mop-up operations. There are several challenges to the eradication of polio from the Region. The principal challenge in India is overcoming suboptimal vaccine efficacy in the districts of western UP which continues to be polio endemic. Another key challenge in the endemic areas is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. While some efforts have been made by the government, these are at present not of sufficient scale to have an impact. More needs to be done in this area. The main challenge for other countries in the Region, in particular the countries that share an open border with India, is to protect their polio-free status by preventing re-infection. A strong routine immunization programme that can deliver and maintain OPV3 coverage greater than 80% in all districts in all countries will help prevent re-infection. Additionally, all polio-free countries must conduct periodic risk assessment to determine the level of risk of re-infection and spread, and to decide whether or not polio immunization campaigns will be required to boost population immunity. Finally, polio eradication requires substantial funding. A substantial proportion is being met through external funding. Member States can help the eradication effort by committing funds for surveillance, outbreak response, and strengthening routine immunization delivery. The paper is submitted to HLP Meeting for its consideration and noting.

HLP Agenda item 5.1 - SEARHEF.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : South-East Asia regional health emergency fund.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-25 )
Abstract

The South-East Asia Regional Health Emergency Fund (SEARHEF) was established through the Regional Committee resolution SEA/RC60/R7. As per the fund’s policies and guidelines, a working group was established to oversee the management of the fund. The working group comprised representatives nominated by all the 11 Member States of the South-East Region. The fund’s resources have been successfully managed and utilized in respect of the following emergencies since it was made operational in January 2008: Cyclone Nargis (Myanmar, May 2008); flashfloods (Sri Lanka, June 2008); Kosi river floods (Nepal, September 2008) ; and the civil conflict in the north of Sri Lanka. In efforts to sustain the fund and improve mechanisms for replenishment of its resources, the Regional Committee, vide resolution SEA/RC61/R2 requested the Regional Director to take steps to roll-over assessed contributions of the fund. Having received a negative response from WHO headquarters to this request due to legal constraints, practical alternatives can be found including a commitment to provide an Assessed Contributions (AC) allocation for 2010-2011 as was done for the 2008-2009 biennium. Increasing the corpus of the fund through Voluntary Contributions (VC), and adopting replenishment procedures will also help in sustaining the fund. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 4.2 - Review Draft Agenda of EB126-INF DOC.PDF.jpg
Review of the draft provisional agenda of the 126th session of the WHO executive board.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-26 )
Abstract

1. Resolution EB122R.8 (Method of work of the Health Assembly) of the 122nd session of the Executive Board. 2. Rules of Procedures of the Executive Board of the World Health Organization.

HLP Agenda item 4.2 - Review Draft Agenda of 126th EB.pdf.jpg
Review of the draft provisional agenda of the 126th session of the who executive board.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-22 )
Abstract

The Draft Provisional Agenda of the 126th session of the WHO Executive Board to be held from 18 to 23 January 2010 is attached for review by the HLP Meeting.

HLP Agenda item 4.1 - Key issues and challenges.pdf.jpg
Key issues and challenges arising out of the sixty-second world health assembly and the 124th and 125th sessions of the who executive board.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-22 )
Abstract

The attached working paper highlights the most significant and relevant decisions and resolutions emanating from the Sixty-second World Health Assembly (held from 16-20 May 2009) as well as the 124th and 125th Sessions of the Executive Board (held from 19-27 January 2009 and on 23 May 2009 respectively). These decisions and resolutions are particularly relevant to the Member States of the WHO South-East Asia (SEA) Region, have obvious and immediate implications for them, and would merit follow-up action by both Member countries as well as WHO at the Regional Office and Country Office levels. The background of the selected decisions/resolutions, highlights from the main operative paragraphs of these selected decisions/resolutions, as well as the regional implications of each decision and/or resolution, as applicable, and actions proposed for Member States and WHO have been presented. The working paper is submitted for consideration by the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for the Regional Committee, with particular reference to the regional implications and actions proposed to be taken towards implementation of the recommendations contained in the selected decisions/ resolutions. The HLP meeting may wish to consider the decisions/resolutions as relevant (details of these decisions/resolutions are provided in the Annexes to this paper). The views and recommendations of the HLP meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-second session of the Regional Committee for review and noting, as appropriate.

Collection's Items (Sorted by Submit Date in Descending order): 1 to 20 of 25

Refine your search