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Meeting of advisory committee (ACM) to review technical matters to be discussed at the sixty-first Session of the Regional Commiittee
( 2008-08-03 )
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Meeting of advisory committee (ACM) to review technical matters to be discussed at the sixty-first session of the Regional Commiittee
( 2008-08-03 )
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Reports by country representatives on their attendance at the meeting of the coordinating bodies of WHO's global programmes, i.e.: UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases: Joint Coordinating Board (JCB)
( 2008-07-02 )
Abstract

The Thirty-first meeting of the Joint Coordinating Board (JCB) was held in Rio-de Janeiro, Brazil, from 16 to 18 June 2008. Representatives from the three JCB Member countries of the South-East Asia (SEA) Region, namely Bhutan, India, and Thailand attended the meeting. In addition, Nepal attended the meeting as an Observer. The attached document contains a brief report on the deliberations of the above mentioned meeting.

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Reports by country representatives on their attendance at the meeting of the coordinating bodies of WHO's global programmes, i.e.: UNDP/World Bank/WHO special programme for research and training in human reproduction: policy and coordination committee (PCC)
( 2008-06-30 )
Abstract

The Twenty-first Meeting of the Policy and Coordination Committee of the UNDP/UNFPA/ WHO/World Bank Special Programme for Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (“the Programme"), was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina on 23-25 June 2008. Representatives from three Member countries of the South-East Asia (SEA) Region, namely Bangladesh, India and Indonesia attended the meeting. The attached document is a brief report on the deliberations of the meeting.

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Follow-up on selected resolutions/decisions of the last three years: international migration of health personnel: a challenge for health systems in developing countries
( 2008-06-28 )
Abstract

International migration of the health workforce is a challenge for countries as it impedes the momentum of strengthening health systems. In response to Regional Committee Resolution SEA/RC60/R9 and to sustain the health workforce in a health system, the Regional Office is developing tools to assess and explore the trend or pattern of migration and categories of health workforce that migrate from and to the South-East Asia (SEA) Region. It is also developing a database for health workforce in the SEA Region that will include the yearly output of health workforce, as well as the proportion that migrates and its categories. The database will contribute towards crafting of policies and strategies for health workforce retention and setting up forums for discussion and exploration to develop a regional code of practice for the ethical recruitment of health workers that will enable government-to-government exchange of the health workforce without incapacitating the health system in the country of origin and collaboration with Global Alliance for Health Workforce, World Trade Organization, Asia Pacific Action Alliance for HRH, International Organization for Migration, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for technical and policy dialogue. The views and recommendations of the Meeting of Advisory Committee (ACM) on this agenda item will be submitted to the Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

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Governing bodies: review of the draft provisional agendas of the 124th session of the WHO Executive Board and the sixty-second World Health Assembly
( 2008-06-27 )
Abstract

The Draft Provisional AGenda of the 124th session of the WHO Executive Board to be held from 19 to 27 January 2009 is attached for review by the Meeting of Advisory Committee ACM). The Provisional Agenda of the Sixty-second World Health Assembly is not yet available at the time fo the ACM.

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Responding to emerging and re-emerging vector-borne diseases
( 2008-06-25 )
Abstract

The paper outlines the growing burden of emerging and re-emerging vector-borne diseases in the South East Asia Region. To prevent the emergence of new vector-borne diseases and re-emergence of those already under control, it is essential to strengthen national vector control programmes. Regional guidelines and activities are in place to bring together to combat vector control against malaria, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis, dengue, Japanese encephalitis and chikungunya etc. Most Member countries of the SEA Region have in place appropriate surveillance system for the vector borne diseases which includes monitoring of drug resistance in the case of malaria and kala-azar. The WHO regional integrated vector control strategy has been developed. Global climate changes, emerging drug resistance and development of pediatric dengue vaccine etc. are the main challenges of the future. The WHO is playing a pivotal role in capacity building, advocacy, partnerships and operational research. The views and recommendations of the Meeting of the Advisory Committee (ACM) on this agenda item will be submitted to the Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

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Public health approach to combating HIV/AIDS
( 2008-06-25 )
Abstract

The HIV epidemic continues to take its toll in the SEA Region. Yet countries have demonstrated that implementing an effective response is feasible, both to halt and reverse epidemics and to provide services to those in need. To date, efforts to scale up HIV/AIDS programmes have involved a variety of different service delivery models, guidelines and tools for multiple HIV/AIDS interventions. Countries seeking to scale up HIV/AIDS health services to achieve universal access will benefit by adopting a service delivery model that brings together the best of these approaches and helps to compensate for the significant health systems challenges that many of them face. Accordingly, WHO promotes a public health approach to the delivery of health services for HIV/AIDS, drawing upon the successful experiences of other health programmes. A public health approach is one that is directed to address the health needs of a population, or the collective health status of the people, rather than just individuals. This paper discusses the four steps of the approach: • Define the problem and the risk factors; • Find out what works to control the disease; • Scale up effective interventions in a wide range of settings; and • Monitor/evaluate the impact and cost-effectiveness of these interventions. The key lessons for a public health approach to HIV include: • The health sector’s role is central in the overall national response to the epidemic; • A scaled-up integrated package of prevention, treatment, care and support services is necessary to halt and reverse the epidemic and mitigate its impact; • Implementing a scaled-up response to the HIV epidemic requires effective programme management, trained human resources and robust health systems. The points for discussion on how the public health approach to HIV can be strengthened further are proposed in this paper. The views and recommendations of the Meeting of the Advisory Committee (ACM) on this agenda item will be submitted to the Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

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Governing bodies: review of the decisions and resolutions of the sixty-first World Health Assembly and the 122nd and 123rd sessions of the Executive Board.
( 2008-06-19 )
Abstract

The attached working paper highlights the most significant and relevant decisions and resolutions emanating from the Sixty-first World Health Assembly (held from 19-24 May 2008) as well as the 122nd and 123rd Sessions of the Executive Board (held from 21-26 January 2008 and on 26-27 May 2008 respectively). These decisions and resolutions are particularly relevant to the Member States of the WHO South-East Asia (SEA) Region, have obvious and immediate implications for them, and would merit follow-up action by both Member countries as well as WHO at the Regional Office and Country Office levels. During the Sixty-first World Health Assembly, Member countries of the SEA Region made consolidated statements on behalf of the Region on seven agenda items, which they themselves identified after considerable discussion among themselves. This was the first time that such an exercise had been undertaken. The background of the selected decisions/ resolutions, highlights from the main operative paragraphs of these selected decisions/ resolutions, as well as the regional implications of each decision and/or resolution, as applicable, and actions proposed for Member States and WHO have been presented. The working paper is submitted for consideration by the Meeting of the Advisory Committee (ACM) to review technical matters to be discussed at Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee in 2008, with particular reference to the regional implications and actions proposed to be taken towards implementation of the recommendations contained in the selected decisions/ resolutions. The ACM may wish to consider the decisions/ resolutions as relevant (details of these decisions/ resolutions are provided in the Annex to this paper). The views and recommendations of the ACM will be submitted to the Sixty-first Session of the Regional Committee in New Delhi for review and noting, as appropriate.

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Climate change and health
( 2008-06-18 )
Abstract

The warming of the planet will be gradual but the frequency and severity of extreme weather events, such as intense storms, heat waves, droughts and floods could be abrupt - the consequences for health will be dramatic. Populations of Member countries in the South-East Asia (SEA)Region are disproportionately more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. The Sixty-first World Health Assembly adopted a resolution requesting WHO and Member States to take urgent action on climate change. The SEA Region has developed a regional action plan to protect human health from the effects of climate change. The goal of the regional action plan is to build capacity and strengthen health systems. Mitigating the effects of climate change can have direct and immediate health benefits. Adaptation is needed: failure to respond will be costly in terms of disease, health-care expenditure and lost productivity. The views and recommendations of the ACM on this agenda item will be submitted to the Twenty-sixth Meeting of Ministers of Health for its consideration.

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