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dc.contributorKronfol, N.M.EN
dc.contributorMansour, Z.EN
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-17T10:14:43Z
dc.date.available2014-06-17T10:14:43Z
dc.date.issued2013EN
dc.identifier.issn1020-3397EN
dc.identifier.otherhttp://applications.emro.who.int/emhj/v19/08/EMHJ_2013_19_8_739_748.pdfEN
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/118535
dc.description739 - 748EN
dc.description.abstractIn the past decade, the number of new cases of tuberculosis worldwide has barely declined and national tuberculosis control and elimination programmes in many high-income countries worldwide are increasingly challenged to address the problem of disease in foreign-born residents and migrant workers. Routine immigration medical screening, either before or after arrival in the recipient country, is designed to avoid the admission of migrants who pose a public health threat. Screening measures, however, have changed with time largely based on respect for individuals' rights. This paper reviews the measures that are being used by countries to screen immigrants and improve their health well-being, and presents cases studies from two Eastern Mediterranean Region countriesEN
dc.language.isoenEN
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEMHJ - Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal, 19 (‎8)‎, 739 - 748, 2013EN
dc.subjectEmigration and ImmigrationEN
dc.subjectMass ScreeningEN
dc.subject.meshTuberculosisEN
dc.titleTuberculosis and migration: a reviewEN


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