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Environment and health research for Europe : third Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health, London, 16-18 June 1999
Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health (3rd: 1999 : London,United Kingdom); World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1999 )
Economic perspectives on environment and health : third Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health, London, 16-18 June 1999
Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health (3rd: 1999 : London, United Kingdom); World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1999 )
Consultation on the use of electronic media for communication of environmental health information by professionals : report on a WHO consultation, Berlin/Potsdam, Germany 27-29 January 1999
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1999 )
Towards good practice in health, environment and safety management in industrial and other enterprises : third Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health, London, 16-18 June 1999
Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health (3rd: 1999 : London, United Kingdom); World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 1999 )
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Guidelines for city twinning produced for the SAVE II cycling project : In Tandem (Promotion of Energy-Efficient Personal Transport in a Network of European Cities)
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2001 )
Abstract

The WHO Centre for Urban Health launched the In Tandem project (Promotion of Energy-efficient Personal Transport in a Network of European Cities), in cooperation with eight European cities. The overall aim of this project is to promote cycling in cities. It is partially funded by the Commission of the European Union DGTREN, Energy and Transport, under its SAVE programme to promote energy efficiency. During Phase II of the project, twinning exchanges between the partner cities were arranged. The aim of these exchanges was to develop or further develop cycling policy through exchange of information and technology transfer. This document makes recommendations for the twinning process, and suggests city pairings. On completion of the process, cities were expected to write a twinning report, including an action plan and feasibility report for promoting cycling in their city

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Precautionary policies and health protection : principles and applications : report on WHO workshop, Rome, Italy 28-29 May 2001
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2002 )
Abstract

Changes in society and rapid developments in technology are producing an ever-increasing variety of agents that may pose unknown risks to human health. Countries and international bodies call for a precautionary approach in making policy choices, and the precautionary principle has received increasing attention as a tool for decision-making in situations of scientific uncertainty. The rationale for applying precautionary policies in the environmental and public health fields is being debated, however, and criteria for developing specific policies remain controversial. WHO therefore convened a workshop: to clarify the concepts and principles of and the options for precautionary policies on the environment and health; to describe the current progress of the work in the field; and to identify the priorities and direction for further work, with special reference to exposure to electromagnetic fields. The workshop started a process in which WHO would review and evaluate the precautionary principle and its application in public health matters. The participants urged that WHO pursue this task

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Floods : climate change and adaptation strategies for human health / report on a WHO meeting, London, United Kingdom 30 June-2 July 2002
( 2002 )
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Methods of assessing human health vulnerability and public health adaptation to climate change / edited by Sari Kovats ... [et al.]
Sari Kovats, R; Menne, Bettina; Ebi, Kristie L; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe; United Nations Environment Programme; World Meteorological Organization; Canada. Health Canada ( 2003 )
Abstract

The fact that climate is changing has become increasingly clear over the past decade. Recent evidence suggests that the associated changes in temperature and precipitation are already adversely affecting population health. The future burden of disease attributable to climate change will depend in part on the timeliness and effectiveness of the interventions implemented. In response to these changing risks, the Third Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health in London in 1999 recommended developing the capacity to undertake national assessments of the potential health effects of climate variability and change, with the goal of identifying: 1) vulnerable populations and subgroups and 2) interventions that could be implemented to reduce the current and future burden of disease. The need to facilitate the transfer of expertise among countries was recognized. This publication is designed to address this need by providing practical information to governments, health agencies and environmental and meteorological institutions in both industrialized and developing countries on quantitative and qualitative methods of assessing human health vulnerability and public health adaptation to climate change. An integrated approach to assessment is encouraged because the impact of climate is likely to transcend traditional sector and regional boundaries, with effects in one sector affecting the coping capacity of another sector or region. Part I describes the objectives and the steps for assessing vulnerability and adaptation and Part II discusses the following issues for a range of health outcomes: the evidence that climate change could affect mortality and morbidity; methods of projecting future effects; and identifying adaptation strategies, policies and measures to reduce current and future negative effects. The health outcomes considered are: morbidity and mortality from heat and heat-waves, air pollution, floods and windstorms and food insecurity; vector-borne diseases; waterborne and foodborne diarrhoeal diseases; and adverse health outcomes associated with stratospheric ozone depletion

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Development of environment and health indicators for European Union countries : report on a WHO working group, Berlin Germany 14-16 May 2003
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2003 )
Abstract

The WHO - European Centre for Environment and Health is implementing a project to establish an environmental health (EH) indicator system. The system is designed to serve public health monitoring and environmental policies in Member States as well as to support multinational analyses. The methodology developed by the WHO project provides the basis for a set of core environment and health indicators for European Union (EU) countries as part of the European Community health monitoring system. An important characteristic of the proposed set is its consistency with the existing body of legislation and regulations at EU level. This Working Group was convened in the framework of the European Commission-sponsored WHO project "Development of Environment and Health Indicators for the EU countries" (ECOEHIS) to evaluate the EH indicators proposed by WHO vis-à-vis the relevant EC body of legislation. The Working Group identified a set of environment and health indicators adequate for EH monitoring in the EU, agreed on the system adjustments necessary for its harmonization with the requirements of the legislation and recommended indicators that need further methodological developments. The ECOEHIS project network was established to effectively steer the process through coordinating country activities, assuring broad discussion by the relevant stakeholders on the proposed environment and health indicators, testing for feasibility and reaching agreement on a set of 'core' indicators through consensus. The group decided on follow-up actions to further reinforce the efforts towards the establishment of European Community health information system in order to facilitate planning, monitoring and evaluation of the relevant policies

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Phenology and human health : allergic disorders : report on a WHO meeting Rome, Italy 16-17 January 2003
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe ( 2003 )
Abstract

With the European phenology network (a European-Commission funded project (EVK2-2000-20005)) and the International Centre for Integrative Studies (ICIS), WHO organized a workshop to discuss the associations between weather, climate change, phenology, pollen trends and allergic disorders, and the possible need to adapt pollen forecasting to a changing climate. The participants included allergologists, bioallergologists, climatologists, epidemiologists, general practitioners, paediatricians and a mathematician. The prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis and eczema in Europe has increased during the second half of the 20th century. The sensitization to pollen allergens has also increased in many areas in Europe. The geographical distribution of plants with allergenic pollen and allergic sensitivity to pollen allergens varies greatly across Europe. But on average the length of the growing season in Europe has increased by 10-11 days over the last 30 years. An earlier start and peak of the pollen season are more pronounced in species that start flowering earlier in the year. The duration of the season is extended in some summer- and late-flowering species. Evidence is growing that climate change might facilitate the geographical spread of particular plant species to new areas as they become climatically suitable. Warming is likely to further cause an earlier onset and may extend the duration of flowering and pollen season, for some species (such as grasses and weeds). Some species, such as ragweed and mugwort, present particular risks for health, and require land use measures, maintenance of public areas, or eradication. The impact of climate change on the incidence, prevalence, distribution and severity of allergic disorders is still uncertain. The numerous scientific disciplines involved highlight the need for an expert task force to devise a common basis of knowledge by sharing scientific, technical and managerial know-how, which is plentiful. The workshop participants recommended multidisciplinary collaboration to further clarify the relationship between changing climate, allergens and allergic disorders and to improve forecasting accuracy and effectiveness