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HIV_2002.12.pdf.jpg
Follow up on the United Nations General Assembly special session on HIV/AIDS : work of WHO : progress report - July 2002
World Health Organization. Dept. of HIV/AIDS ( 2002 )
WHO_SE_72.47.pdf.jpg
Follow up study of smallpox vaccination in the newborn / by Urmila Lakhanpal
Lakhanpal, Urmila ( 1972 )
HLP Agenda item 5.4 - Challenges in polio eradiction.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected Regional Committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : challenges in polio eradication (SEA/RC60/R8)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Abstract

Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. In the first four months of 2010’, 20 polio cases were detected in India with three subtype 1 poliovirus (P1) and 17 subtype 3 poliovirus (P3) cases. This paper presents an update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication. No P1 case has been detected in UP and Bihar in 2010. The three P1 cases reported this year are from Jammu & Kashmir, Maharashtra and West Bengal. In 2009, 80 cases of type 1 wild polio virus were detected in India. Intense efforts reduced the circulation of imported type1 poliovirus in and around western UP. The most affected districts either did not sustain transmission or stopped transmission after 2-7 months. Even though at the beginning of 2009 a reduction in the transmission of P3 cases was observed, the latter half of 2009 witnessed P3 transmission in the endemic areas of western UP and central Bihar. Transmission was more intense in these areas because of fewer type 3 vaccine rounds. The final P3 case count for India in 2009 was 662. There are several challenges to the eradication of polio in the Region. The principal challenge in India is overcoming suboptimal vaccine efficacy in the districts of western UP which continues to be polio endemic. The key challenge here is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. While some efforts have been made by the government, these are at present not of sufficient scale to have an impact. More needs to be done in this area. In non-endemic areas, migrants have been playing an important role in the spread of WPV1 as they are highly mobile, more likely to be missed and need special efforts of surveillance and supplementary immunization activity (SIA) operations. The P1 case detected in Nepal in February in a district adjoining Bihar and the current P1 outbreak in Tajikistan epidemiologically linked to India indicate that the key challenge for other countries in the Region and beyond is to protect their polio-free status by preventing re-infection. A strong routine immunization programme that can deliver and maintain OPV3 coverage greater than 80% in all districts in all countries will help prevent re-infection. Additionally, all polio-free countries must conduct periodic risk assessment to determine the level of risk of re-infection and spread, and to decide whether or not polio immunization campaigns will be required to boost population immunity.

HLP Agenda item 5.1 - Collaboration withn the UN system.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : collaboration within the un system and with other international agencies and partnerships
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Abstract

The recognition of health as a key element for sustainable development and global security has resulted in a substantial increase in global resources for health in recent years. At the same time, the diversity and number of health actors have also increased significantly, with private and non-state actors contributing significant resources to development assistance for health. With this proliferation of actors in health, WHO, particularly at country level must coordinate its work, through effective partnerships, not only with government authorities but also with other United Nations (UN) agencies, donors, and civil society organizations, in order to ensure alignment of health strategies and goals and improve health development outcomes at country level. The attached paper provides an overview of WHO’s collaboration within the UN system and with other international agencies and partnerships over the last year. It reflects the Organization’s commitment to UN reform, as well as its efforts in collaborating with a diverse and complementary array of partners to enhance the effectiveness of the global health community in accelerating the achievement of the internationally-agreed health development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/16) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.2 - Nutrition and Food Safety.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : nutrition and food safety in the South-East Asia Region (SEA/RC60/R3)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-22 )
Abstract

The working paper on nutrition and food safety in the South-east Asia Region provides a brief overview of the nutrition and food safety situation in Member States of the South-East Asia (SEA) Region. It indicates that while overall food consumption has increased and nutrition indicators have shown improvement, the global economic crisis and climate change may lead to food insecurity and increase in the number of malnourished individuals. The paper describes some of the key nutrition and food safety indicators in the Region. Activities in nutrition and food safety undertaken during the reporting period and proposed activities to be conducted in the biennium are also tabulated. It concludes by identifying a range of supportive actions from Member States with regard to the promotion of nutrition and food safety in the SEA Region: to increase political commitment in order to promote national nutrition and food safety programmes; to mainstream nutrition and food safety issues into all national health policies and strategies and ensure the implementation of global strategies on infant and young child feeding, food safety, diet, physical activity and health; to strengthen nutrition surveillance systems and implement the WHO Child Growth Standards and Growth References through their full integration into child and adolescent health programmes; to develop and maintain sustainable and comprehensive preventive measures for reducing the burden of foodborne diseases encompassing the complete food-production chain from farm to consumption; to enable active and appropriate participation of national authorities in activities of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, INFOSAN and other international networks; and to strengthen the laboratory capacity for investigating and reporting on foodborne diseases outbreaks. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/17) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.5 - Prevention and control of NCDs.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected Regional Committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : Scaling up prevention and control of chronic noncommunicable diseases in the South-East Asia Region (SEA/RC60/R4)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Abstract

WHO action in the area of prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in the South-East Asia (SEA) Region is guided by the Regional Framework for Prevention and Control of NCDs. The Framework was formulated in close collaboration with Member States and endorsed by the health secretaries of Member States of the Region at their 11th Meeting in 2006. The WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia, vide its resolution on Scaling up Prevention and Control of Chronic Noncommunicable Disease (NCDs) in the South-East Asia Region (SEA/RC60/R4) further deliberated on and endorsed the Regional Framework and requested the Regional Director to report to the Sixty-third session of the Regional Committee in 2010 on the progress achieved in its implementation. The Regional Framework aims at facilitating the process of developing, updating and implementing national policies, plans and programmes for integrated prevention and control of major NCDs including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic pulmonary diseases and diabetes. It is based on public health principles and on national, regional and global consensus on policy and technical actions for prevention and control of NCDs and their primary risk factors. The attached working paper reflects on the health and socio-economic impact of NCDs in the Region. It reports on actions taken by Member States and by the WHO Secretariat, since the adoption of the Framework, to scale up prevention and control of NCDs. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/20) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.3 - SEAR efforts on measles elimination.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected Regional Committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : South-East Asia regional efforts on measles elimination (SEA/RC62/R3)
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2010-06-15 )
Abstract

The regional consultation on measles held in SEARO in August 2009, agreed that measles elimination was technically, biologically and programmatically feasible. The consultation proposed setting a regional goal to eliminate measles by 2020 to the sixty-second session of the Regional Committee in Kathmandu in September 2009. The Regional Committee decided that setting a regional measles elimination goal would be considered at its sixty-third session in 2010. The Regional Committee adopted a resolution requesting several actions including a “report to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee on the status of global measles elimination goals and outcome of activities in the South-East Asia Region”. The current global goal is 90% reduction of mortality due to measles by 2010 or earlier compared to mortality in 2000. Following implementation of various strategies, measles mortality has been reduced globally by 78% from an estimated 733,000 in 2000 to 164,000 in 2008. WHO has estimated that between 2000 and 2008 the annual number of measles deaths in the SEA Region decreased by 46% (from 234 000 to 126 000). However, all countries in the Region except India have reached or exceeded the 2010 goal of 90% reduction in measles mortality. The WHO Region of the Americas achieved measles elimination in 2002. The Eastern Mediterranean, European, Western Pacific and African regions have set measles elimination goals. Measles eradication is defined as the worldwide interruption of measles transmission; the simultaneous elimination of measles in all WHO regions would equate to global eradication. The 126th session of the Executive Board in January 2010 and the sixty-third World Health Assembly in May 2010 reviewed a report on “Global Eradication of measles” prepared by the Secretariat. This paper summarizes requirements to be met before setting a goal for measles eradication, interim milestones towards global eradication of measles, situation analysis of measles control and progress towards measles elimination in Member States of the Region and potential challenges in achieving measles elimination in the Region. The attached working paper (Doc. SEA/RC63/18) is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. The recommendations made by the HLP Meeting will be submitted to the Sixty-third Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.1 - SEARHEF.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : South-East Asia regional health emergency fund.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-25 )
Abstract

The South-East Asia Regional Health Emergency Fund (SEARHEF) was established through the Regional Committee resolution SEA/RC60/R7. As per the fund’s policies and guidelines, a working group was established to oversee the management of the fund. The working group comprised representatives nominated by all the 11 Member States of the South-East Region. The fund’s resources have been successfully managed and utilized in respect of the following emergencies since it was made operational in January 2008: Cyclone Nargis (Myanmar, May 2008); flashfloods (Sri Lanka, June 2008); Kosi river floods (Nepal, September 2008) ; and the civil conflict in the north of Sri Lanka. In efforts to sustain the fund and improve mechanisms for replenishment of its resources, the Regional Committee, vide resolution SEA/RC61/R2 requested the Regional Director to take steps to roll-over assessed contributions of the fund. Having received a negative response from WHO headquarters to this request due to legal constraints, practical alternatives can be found including a commitment to provide an Assessed Contributions (AC) allocation for 2010-2011 as was done for the 2008-2009 biennium. Increasing the corpus of the fund through Voluntary Contributions (VC), and adopting replenishment procedures will also help in sustaining the fund. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.6 - Harmful use of alcohol.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : strategies to reduce harmful use of alcohol.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-09 )
Abstract

The WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia, vide resolution SEA/RC59/R8, requested the Regional Office to provide technical support to Member States in building and strengthening programmes on prevention of harm from alcohol use. The basis for the prevention of alcohol-related harm in the context of the South-East Asia Region should not only be disease prevention but reduction of poverty, disempowerment, violence, prevention of injuries and improvement of well-being and social capital. Programmes should address local patterns of alcohol consumption and attitudes of the communities. Another issue of concern is the consumption of alcohol among women, which is currently quite low, but is gradually increasing. Illicit alcohol production and consumption is also of concern in the Region. Legislation and policy measures alone cannot fully address the reduction of harm related to alcohol use in the Region. Thus, community empowerment programmes become important as a strategy to reduce harm from alcohol use in the community. Initiatives to reduce harm from alcohol use in the Region have to take into account all the above factors. A single solution to this problem does not exist in the context of the Region. Hence, care should be taken to ensure that interventions are tailored to the countries and communities they are addressed to. The strategies proposed by the Regional Office to reduce the harmful use of alcohol include: (a) Support to Member States for developing alcohol-related policy; (b) Regional contribution to the draft document “Towards a Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Use of Alcohol”; and (c) Community action to reduce harm from alcohol use, based on evidence from the Region. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.2 - Polio Eradication.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years : update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-17 )
Abstract

Polio eradication continues to be a priority in the South-East Asia Region. In the first four months of 2009*, 40 polio cases were detected in India with 14 subtype 1 poliovirus (P1) and 26 subtype 3 poliovirus (P3) cases. This paper presents an update on the progress and challenges in polio eradication. At the start of 2008 a reduction in the transmission of P1 cases, particularly in western Uttar Pradesh (UP) was seen which, however, was offset by re-importation from Bihar in the later half of the year, resulting in 62 subtype P1 cases. Rapid and large-scale mop-up immunizations prevented P1 importation into neighbouring states. The subtype P3 outbreak of 2007 was rapidly controlled with massive outbreak response and mop-up operations. There are several challenges to the eradication of polio from the Region. The principal challenge in India is overcoming suboptimal vaccine efficacy in the districts of western UP which continues to be polio endemic. Another key challenge in the endemic areas is the low levels of sanitation and personal hygiene. While some efforts have been made by the government, these are at present not of sufficient scale to have an impact. More needs to be done in this area. The main challenge for other countries in the Region, in particular the countries that share an open border with India, is to protect their polio-free status by preventing re-infection. A strong routine immunization programme that can deliver and maintain OPV3 coverage greater than 80% in all districts in all countries will help prevent re-infection. Additionally, all polio-free countries must conduct periodic risk assessment to determine the level of risk of re-infection and spread, and to decide whether or not polio immunization campaigns will be required to boost population immunity. Finally, polio eradication requires substantial funding. A substantial proportion is being met through external funding. Member States can help the eradication effort by committing funds for surveillance, outbreak response, and strengthening routine immunization delivery. The paper is submitted to HLP Meeting for its consideration and noting.

HLP Agenda item 5.7 - Pandemic influenza preparedness.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: pandemic influenza preparedness: sharing of influenza viruses and access to vaccines and other benefits.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-08 )
Abstract

Viruses have been freely shared through WHO Collaborating Centres on Influenza for the purpose of risk assessment and vaccine production. In 2007 Indonesia proposed that sharing of H5N1 avian influenza viruses should be tied to benefits of affordable and available vaccine. This led to a halt in the practice of freely sharing influenza viruses. A number of unsuccessful attempts have been made to resolve this impasse. The last inter-governmental meeting (IGM) was convened before the World Health Assembly, on 16-17, May 2009 in Geneva. The meeting ended with a consensus on most issues, but left datasharing between laboratories and intellectual property rights on viruses unresolved. The main areas of progress have been in consolidating the system, structure and mechanisms of virus sharing and include the establishment of a traceability mechanism in January 2008 to track all shared H5N1 viruses; an interim system providing full disclosure of information on transfer and movement of virus; establishment of an advisory mechanism by the WHO Director-General to monitor the functioning of the NIC and WHO Collaborating Centres; establishment of an international stockpile of vaccines for H5N1 funded by the Gates Foundation and strengthening surveillance at animal-human interface through collaboration between WHO, FAO, UNICEF and OIE. In addition, two working groups on Standard Material Transfer Agreement (SMTA) and terms of reference for WHO CCs and WHO H5N1 Reference labs were established. The specific policyrelated technical issues are: specific clauses of IHR (2005) may need to be modified to ensure compliance with virus sharing; vaccine sharing mechanisms and agreements need to be developed between Member States; benefits must be concrete and, clear and provided to developing countries, especially affected countries; do countries have sovereign right over their biological resources?; epidemiologic data related to influenza burden (both seasonal and novel pandemic influenza) are needed to justify expansion of influenza vaccine production. In addition, there is a need to explore innovative mechanisms for licensing existing or future intellectual property rights and of platforms to promote access to vaccine technology by developing countries and specific financing and funding mechanisms that could be made available to developing countries to purchase vaccine and to ensure adequate funding for needed activities such as rapid vaccine deployment. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.4 - Public health innovation.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: public health, innovation and intellectual property.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-06-22 )
Abstract

After intensive negotiations over a two-year period, the World Health Assembly in May 2008 adopted resolution WHA61.21 on public health, innovation and intellectual property together with the global strategy and plan of action (GSPOA). Several outstanding issues were finalized and adopted during the Sixty-second World Health Assembly in May 2009. The GSPOA aims to promote new thinking on innovation and access to medicines, and to enhance needs-based research and development (R&D) relevant to diseases that mainly affect developing countries. The scope of the GSPOA however is vast; thus, there may be a need for prioritization at national and regional levels. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

HLP Agenda item 5.3 - Strengthening Health Workforce.pdf.jpg
Follow-up action on pending issues and selected regional committee resolutions/decisions for the last three years: strengthening the health workforce in South-East Asia.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-05-08 )
Abstract

This document highlights the progress made in the South-East Asia Region following the adoption of resolution SEA/RC59/R6 on strengthening the health workforce in South-East Asia by the Regional Committee for South-East Asia in Dhaka, Bangladesh in September 2006. Many of the activities have been specified in the South-East Asia Regional Strategic Plan for Human Resource Development which has been finalized following endorsement by the Fifty-ninth session of the Regional Committee. The overall goal was ensuring equitable access to effective health services through an adequate and balanced distribution of sufficient, competent, and highly motivated health workforce. The Committee also requested the Regional Director to facilitate several actions in relation to regional health workforce development. The progress made by the Region in this regard is mentioned in detail in the document. The attached working paper is submitted to the High-Level Preparatory (HLP) Meeting for its review and recommendations. These recommendations will be submitted to the Sixty-second Session of the Regional Committee for its consideration.

Follow-Up Actions on the Decisions and Recommendations of ..pdf.jpg
Follow-up Actions on the Decisions and Recommendations of the 24 th Health Ministers' Meeting . Follow -Up on the Dhaka Declaration on Strengthening the Health Workforce in the South-East Asia Region.
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2007-09 )
SEA-ACHR-31-6.pdf.jpg
Follow-up actions on the recommendations of the thirtieth session of WHO SEA-ACHR: avian influenza research
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-18 )
SEA-ACHR-31-5.pdf.jpg
Follow-up actions on the recommendations of the thirtieth session of WHO SEA-ACHR: broad major recommendations
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-18 )
SEA-ACHR-31-8.pdf.jpg
Follow-up actions on the recommendations of the thirtieth session of WHO SEA-ACHR: promotion of research and development in areas of drugs and vaccines
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-18 )
SEA-ACHR-31-7.pdf.jpg
Follow-up actions on the recommendations of the thirtieth session of WHO SEA-ACHR: research management in countries
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia ( 2009-07-18 )
B132_13-en.pdf.jpg
Follow-up actions to recommendations of the high-level commissions convened to advance women's and children's health: report by the Secretariat
Executive Board, 132 ( 2013 )
A66_14-en.pdf.jpg
Follow-up actions to recommendations of the high-level commissions convened to advance women’s and children’s health : Report by the Secretariat
World Health Assembly, 66 ( 2013 )
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