WHO LOGO

Central Data Catalog

Citation Information

Type Journal Article - GPE Discussion Paper
Title WHO Multi-country Survey Study on Health and Responsiveness 2000-2001
Author(s)
Issue 37
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2001
URL http://cdrwww.who.int/healthinfo/survey/whspaper37.pdf
Abstract
In order to develop various methods of comparable data collection on health and health system responsiveness WHO started a scientific survey study in 2000-2001. This study has used a common survey instrument in nationally representative populations with modular structure for assessing health of indviduals in various domains, health system responsiveness, household health care expenditures, and additional modules in other areas such as adult mortality and health state valuations.
The health module of the survey instrument was based on selected domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and was developed after a rigorous scientific review of various existing assessment instruments. The responsiveness module has been the result of ongoing work over the last 2 years that has involved international consultations with experts and key informants and has been informed by the scientific literature and pilot studies. Questions on household expenditure and proportionate expenditure on health have been borrowed from existing surveys. The survey instrument has been developed in multiple languages using cognitive interviews and cultural applicability tests, stringent psychometric tests for reliability (i.e. test-retest reliability to demonstrate the stability of application) and most importantly, utilizing novel psychometric techniques for cross-population comparability.

Related studies

»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
Ustun, Bedirhan T, Somnath Chatterji, Maria Villanueva, Lydia Bendib, Can Celik, Ritu Sadana, Nicole Valentine, Juan Ortiz, Ajay Tandon, Joshua Salomon, and others. "WHO Multi-country Survey Study on Health and Responsiveness 2000-2001." GPE Discussion Paper , no. 37 (2001).
© WHO 2018