WHO Expert Committee on Drug Dependence
Twenty-ninth Report
Technical Report Series, No 856
World Health Organization
ISBN-13    9789241208567 ISBN-10    9241208562
Order Number    11000856 Format    E-book collection (PDF)
Price    CHF    6.00 / US$    7.20 Developing countries:    CHF    4.20
English     1995        21   pages
Summary
Table of contents
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Summary
Records the recommendations of a WHO expert committee commissioned to review information on psychoactive substances and issue advice on the need for their international control under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances, 1971. When making its recommendations, the committee balances consideration of a drug's therapeutic usefulness against data on its pharmacological and toxicological properties, evidence of its dependence potential and likelihood of abuse, and an assessment of the corresponding risk to public health.
The report opens with a presentation of supplementary working guidelines to complement the criteria, developed in 1969, used by the committee when making scheduling recommendations. The main section summarizes the evidence reviewed when formulating recommendations for the scheduling or rescheduling of eight substances: aminorex, brotizolam, etryptamine, flunitrapezam, mesocarb, methcathinone, zipeprol, and triazolam. Of these, two were placed in Schedule I, one in Schedule II, one moved from Schedule IV to Schedule III, and the remainder placed or kept in Schedule IV.
A third section briefly considers data on an additional three substances (trihexyphenidyl, zolpidem, and zopiclone) to determine whether these should be reviewed in the future in the context of international control. The report concludes with a discussion of issues relevant to the international drug control system, including the desirability of developing a simplified procedure for making controlled drugs available in emergency or disaster situations, and the need for guidelines for the treatment and rehabilitation of drug-dependent persons.