HEALTH FOR THE WORLD'S ADOLESCENTS

A second chance in the second decade

References

Introduction

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Adolescence: a period needing special attention

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101. Elliott AS. Meeting the health care needs of street-involved youth. Paediatrics & Child Health, 2013, 18(6):317–326.

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106. Rebecca OM et al. Glycemic control in US immigrant and nonimmigrant black youth with type 1 diabetes. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 2014, 23.

107. Chitsabesan P et al. Mental health needs of young offenders in custody and in the community. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2006, 188:534–540.

108. Barrett B et al. Mental health provision for young offenders: service use and cost. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2006, 188:541–546.

109. Corliss HL et al. An evaluation of service utilization among male to female transgender youth: qualitative study of a clinic-based sample. Journal of LGBT Health Research, 2007, 3(2):49–61.

110. Mustanski B et al. Envisioning an America without sexual orientation inequities in adolescent health. American Journal of Public Health, 2014, 104(2):218–225.

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112. Denno DM, Chandra-Mouli V, Osman M. Reaching youth with out-of-facility HIV and reproductive health services: a systematic review. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2012, 51(2):106–121.

113. Gotz HM et al. Management of Chlamydia cases and their partners: results from a home-based screening program organized by municipal public health services with referral to regular health care. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2005, 32(10):625–629.

114. Andersen B et al. Population-based strategies for outreach screening of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections: a randomized, controlled trial. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2002,185(2):252–258.

115. Wendell DA et al. Street outreach for HIV prevention: effectiveness of a state-wide programme. International Journal of STD & AIDS, 2003, 14(5):334–340.

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118. Harper CC et al. The effect of increased access to emergency contraception among young adolescents. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2005, 106(3):483–491.

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124. Weinberger SE et al. Competency-based education and training in internal medicine. Annals of Internal Medicine, 2010, 153(11):751–756.

125. Sanci LA et al. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an educational intervention for general practitioners in adolescent health care: randomised controlled trial. British Medical Journal, 2000, 320(7229):224–230.

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127. Michaud PA et al. The development and pilot-testing of a training curriculum in adolescent medicine and health. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2004, 35(1):51–57.

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131. Ercan O et al. Demography of adolescent health care delivery and training in Europe. European Journal of Pediatrics, 2009, 168(4):417–426.

132. Michaud PA et al. The development and pilot-testing of a training curriculum in adolescent medicine and health. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2004, 35(1):51–57.

133. Hardoff D et al. Minding the gap: training in adolescent medicine when formal training programmes are not available. Archives of Diseases in Childhood (Education and Practice Edition), 2009, 94(5):157–160.

134. Ercan O et al. Demography of adolescent health care delivery and training in Europe. European Journal of Pediatrics, 2009, 168(4):417–426.

135. The world health report 2006. Working together for health. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2006.

136. Chatterjee S. Recommendations on curriculum on adolescent health for UG and PG medical education, 2009. Indian Journal of Public Health, 2009, 53(2):115–121.

137. Michaud PA et al. The development and pilot-testing of a training curriculum in adolescent medicine and health. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2004, 35(1):51–57.

138. Hardoff D et al. Minding the gap: training in adolescent medicine when formal training programmes are not available. Archives of Diseases in Childhood (Education and Practice Edition), 2009, 94(5):157–160.

139. Lee RL et al. Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated curriculum on adolescent health and development for pre-service nursing education in Hong Kong. Nurse Education Today, 2006, 26(4):286–297.

140. The Adolescent Health Programme. E-learning project, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and e-Learning for Healthcare (e-LfH). London, National Health Service DoHC&YPPHP, 2013.

141. The Adolescent Health Programme. E-learning project, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and e-Learning for Healthcare (e-LfH). London, National Health Service DoHC&YPPHP, 2013.

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145. Koon AD, Goudge J, Norris SA. A review of generalist and specialist community health workers for delivering adolescent health services in sub-Saharan Africa. Human Resources for Health, 2013, 11:54.

146. Casey GJ et al. A free weekly iron-folic acid supplementation and regular deworming programme is associated with improved haemoglobin and iron status indicators in Vietnamese women. BMC Public Health, 2009, 9(1):261.

147. Ross DA et al. Biological and behavioural impact of an adolescent sexual health intervention in Tanzania: a community-randomized trial. AIDS, 2007, 21(14):1943–1955.

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152. Ganatra B, Hirve S. Induced abortions among adolescent women in rural Maharashtra, India. Reproductive Health Matters, 2002, 10(19):76–85.

153. Rasch V, Silberschmidt M. Illegal abortion among adolescents in Dar es Salaam. Promoting adolescent sexual and reproductive health in East and Southern Africa.Uppsala, The Nordic Africa Institute, 2008.

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158. Geissler PW et al. Self-treatment by Kenyan and Ugandan schoolchildren and the need for school-based education. Health Policy and Planning, 2001, 16(4):362–371.

159. Hampshire KR et al. Out of the reach of children? Young people's health-seeking practices and agency in Africa's newly-emerging therapeutic landscapes. Social Science & Medicine, 2011, 73(5):702–710.

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166. Ahmedov M et al. Uzbekistan: health system review. Health systems in transition, 3rd edition. Copenhagen, World Health Organization, 2007.

167. Anell A, Glenngård AH, Merkur S. Health systems review. Health systems in transition, 5th edition. Copenhagen, World Health Organization, 2012.

168. Blümel M. The German health care system. Berlin, Berlin University of Technology, 2012.

169. Bryndová L et al. Czech Republic: health system review health systems in transition. Report No. 1. Copenhagen, World Health Organization, 2009.

170. Camenzind P. The Swiss health care system.The Commonwealth Fund. Neuchatel, Swiss Health Observatory, 2012.

171. Hossein Z, Gerard A. Trends in cost sharing among selected high income countries, 2000–2010. Health Policy, 2013, 112:35–44.

172. Johnsen JR. Health systems in transition: Norway, 1st edition. Copenhagen, WHO Regional Office for Europe on behalf of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, 2006.

173. Lindahl AK. The Norwegian health care system. The Commonwealth Fund. Hamar, The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Health Services, 2012.

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Strategic information to guide the health sector response

1. Country monitoring and evaluation guidance. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011
(http://www.who.int/healthinfo/country_monitoring_evaluation/documentation/en/index.html, accessed 28 February 2014).

2. WHO draft health indicators for adolescents: Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health. Geneva, World Health Organisation, 2014.

3. Patton GP etal. Health of the World’s Adolescents: a synthesis of internationally comparable data. Lancet 2012, 379: 1665-1675

4. Demographic and health survey. Zomba, National Statistical Office of Malawi, 2010.

5. National strategy for development of health of children and adolescents 2010–2015 and the National Programme on young people’s development 2011-2014. Dushanbe, Government of Tajikistan, 2010.

6. Youth-friendly health services in Tajikistan: Experience of three pilot cities in 2006 and 2007. United Nations Children’s Fund, 2007.

7. Global maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health survey on policy indicators. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2014.

8. Global school health policies and practices survey: G-SHPPS Manual. Washington, DC and Geneva, Center for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization (in press).

9. Service availability and readiness assessment. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2012
(http://www.who.int/healthinfo/systems/sara_introduction/en/index.html, accessed 6 February 2014).

10. Bose K et al. Do efforts to standardize, assess & improve the quality of health service provision to adolescents in low & middle income countries, lead to improvements in service-quality & service-utilization? Addis Ababa, International Conference on Family Planning, 2013.

11. What we do: The DHS Program. Washington, D.C., United States Agency for International Development, 2014.
(http://www.dhsprogram.com/What-We-Do/Survey-Types/DHS.cfm, accessed 7 February 2014).

12. AIS Overview. Washington, D.C., United States Agency for International Development, 2014.
(http://www.dhsprogram.com/What-We-Do/Survey-Types/AIS.cfm, accessed 7 February 2014).

13. ChildInfo: MICS4 Surveys. New York, United Nation’s Children’s Fund, 2014
(http://www.childinfo.org/mics4_surveys.html, accessed 28 February 2014).

14. STEPwise approach to surveillance. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2014
(http://www.who.int/chp/steps/en/, accessed 6 February 2014).

15. GATS (Global adult tobacco survey). Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013
(http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/gats/en/, accessed 6 February 2014).

16. GYTS (Global youth tobacco survey). Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013
(http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/gyts/en/, accessed 6 February 2014).

17. Health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC). Geneva, World Health Organization, 2012
(http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/Life-stages/child-and-adolescent-health/adolescent-health/health-behaviour-in-school-aged-children-hbsc2.-who-collaborative-cross-national-study-of-children-aged-1115, accessed 6 February 2014).

18. Global school-based student health survey. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013
(http://www.who.int/chp/gshs/en/, accessed 6 February 2014).

19. World health statistics 2012. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2012. 20. Global health estimates 2013 summary tables: deaths by cause, age and sex by WHO regional group and World Bank income classification, 2000–2012 (provisional estimates). Geneva, World Health Organization, 2014.

21. The United Nations OneHealth Costing Tool. Glastonbury, Futures Institute, 2013.
(http://futuresinstitute.org/Download/Spectrum/Manuals/OneHealth_Leaflet-Faqs.pdf, accessed 2 April 2014).





Policies to support adolescents’ health

1. World social security report 2010/2011. Geneva, International Labour Organization, 2010.

2. Legislation and regulation. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2014
(http://www.who.int/heli/tools/legis_regul/en/index.html, accessed 6 February 2014).

3. The Health and Environment Linkages Initiative. Legislation and regulation. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2005
(http://www.who.int/topics/health_policy/en/, accessed 6 February 2014).

4. Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly. Resolution WHA65.6. Annex 2: Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2012.
(http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/WHA65.6_annex2_en.pdf, accessed 15 March 2014).

5. Lovato C, Watts A, Stead LF. Impact of tobacco advertising and promotion on increasing adolescent smoking behaviours. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2011, 10:CD003439.

6. Snyder LB et al. Effects of alcohol advertising exposure on drinking among youth. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 2006, 160:18–24.

7. Buijzen et al. Explaining the link between television viewing and childhood obesity: a test of three alternative hypotheses. Journal of Children and Media, 2008, 2:67–74.

8. Catalano RF et al. Worldwide application of prevention science in adolescent health. The Lancet, 2012, 379:1654–64.

9. Youth policy: building a global evidence base for youth policy. Berlin, Youth Policy, 2014
(http://www.youthpolicy.org/, accessed 6 February 2014).

10. Walt G et al. ‘Doing’ health policy analysis: methodological and conceptual reflections and challenges. Health Policy and Planning, 2008, 23:308–317. doi:10.1093/heapol/czn024

11. Nuffield Council on Bioethics. Public health ethical issues. London, Nuffield Council on Bioethics, 2007
(http://www.nuffieldbioethics.org, accessed 6 February 2014).

12. Diepeveen S et al. Public acceptability of government interventions to change health-related behaviours: a systematic review and narrative synthesis. BMC Public Health, 2013, 13:756
(http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/13/756, accessed 20 February 2014).

13. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013.

14. Marketing of foods high in fat, salt and sugar to children: update 2012–2013. Copenhagen, WHO Regional Office for Europe, 2013.

15. An examination of the implementation of the WHO recommendations on the marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children; with a focus on media advertising regulation, in selected African states. Geneva, World Health Organization, Department of Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, [unpublished].

16. Personal communication, Godfrey Xuereb, 2014.

17. Recommendations from a Pan American Health Organization Expert Consultation On The Marketing Of Food And Non-Alcoholic Beverages To Children In the Americas. Pan American Health Organization, Washington, DC, 2011
(http://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_download&gid=16792&Itemid=, accessed 6 February 2014).

18. Informal Consultation on Reducing the Harmful Impact on Children of Marketing Foods, Beverages, Tobacco and Alcohol, 25–26 September 2013. Manila, World Health Organization, Western Pacific Regional Office, 2014.

19. Toroyan T, Peden M (eds), Youth and road safety. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2007

20. Global status report on road safety 2013. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2013

21. The reproductive health of adolescents: a strategy for action. A joint WHO/UNFPA/UNICEF statement, 1989. Geneva, World Health Organization, 1989
(http://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/39306#sthash.g67YAhtD.dpuf, accessed 6 February 2014).

22. UNAIDS Securing the future today. Synthesis of strategic information on HIV and young people. Geneva, UNAIDS, 2011.

23. Nirenberg, O. et al. Evaluación regional planes de salud adolescente 2007. Washington, DC, Pan American Health Organization. Unpublished. Available at: http://portal.paho.org/sites/fch/CA/WS/rahs/default.aspx

24. PAHO Regional plan of action for improving adolescent and youth health 2010–2012. Washington, DC, Pan American Health Organization. Unpublished.

25. Chandra-Mouli V et al. Contraception for adolescents in low and middle income countries: needs, barriers and access. Reproductive Health, 2014, 11:1. doi:10.1186/1742-4755-11-1

26. Ringheim K Ethical and human rights perspectives on providers’ obligations to ensure adolescents rights to privacy. Studies in Family Planning, 2007, 38(4) 245–252

27. Ringheim K Ethical and human rights perspectives on providers’ obligations to ensure adolescents rights to privacy. Studies in Family Planning, 2007, 38(4) 245–252..

28. Larcher V, Hutchinson A. How should paediatricians assess Gillick competence? Archives of Disease in Childhood, 2010, 95:307–311.

29. Chandra-Mouli V et al. Contraception for adolescents in low and middle income countries: needs, barriers and access. Reproductive Health, 2014, 11:1.

30. Advancing ASRH through human rights: strengthening laws, regulations and policies – Sri Lanka. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.

31. Jamison DT et al. Global health 2035. A world converging within a generation. The Lancet, 2014, 382:1898–1955.





Working with other sectors

1. Reichow B et al. Non-specialist psychosocial interventions for children and adolescents with intellectual disability or lower-functioning autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review. PLOS Medicine, 2013, 10(12).

2. Wight D, Fullerton D. A review of interventions with parents to promote the sexual health of their children. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2013, 52:4–27.

3. Compilation of evidence-based family skills training programmes. Vienna, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
(http://www.unodc.org/docs/youthnet/Compilation/10-50018_Ebook.pdf, accessed 16 March 2014).

4. Mikton C. Two challenges to importing evidence-based child maltreatment prevention programmes developed in high-income countries to low- and middle-income countries: generalizability and affordability? In: Dubowitz H, ed. World perspectives on child abuse, 10th edition. Aurora, Colorado, International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, 2012.

5. Hutchings J, Gardner F, Lane E. Making evidence-based interventions work. In: Sutton , Utting D, Farrington D, eds. Support from the start: working with young children and their families to reduce the risks of crime and anti-social behaviour. Norwich, UK, Department for Education and Skills, 2004:69–79.

6. Kaminski, JW et al. A meta-analytic review of components associated with parent training program effectiveness. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 2008, 36:567–589.

7. Lundgren R, Amin A. Addressing intimate partner and sexual violence among adolescents: emerging evidence of effectiveness. [Unpublished].

8. Testing times: a review of HIV counselling and testing within sports for development programmes for young people in Southern Africa. Johannesburg, Centre for AIDS Development, Research and Evaluation, 2012.

9. Cook, P. Understanding the effects of adolescent participation in health programs. International Journal of Childrens’ Rights, 2008, 16:121–139.

10. Villa-Torres L, Svanemyr J. Ensuring youth’s right to participation and promotion of youth leadership in policy and program development of sexual and reproductive health programs. [Unpublished].

11. Participate: the voice of young people in programmes and policies. London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 2008.

12. Matzopoulos R et al. Interpersonal violence prevention: prioritising interventions. South African Medical Journal, 2008, 98(9):682–690.

13. Transport (road transport): shared interests in sustainable outcomes. Social Determinants of Health Sectoral Briefing Series, 3. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.

14. Shared interests in well-being and development. Social Determinants of Health Sectoral Briefing Series, 2. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2011.

15. Bundy D. Rethinking school health: a key component of education for all. Washington, World Bank, 2011.

16. Baker DP et al. The education effect on population health: a reassessment. Population and Development Review, 37(2):307–332.

17. Baird SJ et al. Effect of a cash transfer programme for schooling on prevalence of HIV and herpes simplex type 2 in Malawi: a cluster randomised trial. The Lancet, 2012, 379:1320–1329.

18. Preventing HIV and teen pregnancy in Kenya: the roles of teacher training and education subsidies. Cambridge, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Lab, 2012.
(http://www.povertyactionlab.org/evaluation/preventing-hiv-and-teen-pregnancy-kenya-roles-teacher-training-and-education-subsidies, accessed 6 February 2014).

19. Skills for health, Information series on school health, Document 9. Geneva, World Health Organization
(www.who.int/school_youth_health/media/en/sch_skills4health_03.pdf, accessed 6 February 2014).

20. First Consultation of the Americas – Ministers of Education. A new culture of health in the school context, Mexico City, Mexico, October 16–19, 2012. Toronto, Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, 2012.

21. Oliver S, et al. Health promotion, inequalities and young people’s health: a systematic review of research. London, EPPI Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London, 2008.

22. Bonell C et al. Systematic review of the effects of schools and school environment interventions on health: evidence mapping and synthesis. Public Health Research, 2013, 1:1.

23. Jamal F et al. The school environment and student health: a systematic review and meta ethnography of qualitative research. BMC Public Health, 2013, 13:798.

24. FRESH Focusing resources on effective school health
(http://www.freshschools.org, accessed 27 February 2014).

25. Langford R et al. The WHO health promoting school framework for improving the health and well-being of students and their academic environment. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, forthcoming.

26. Saewyc E et al. School-based strategies to reduce suicidal ideation and attempts among lesbian, gay, and bisexual, as well as heterosexual adolescents in Western Canada. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 2014, 1:89–112.

27. Hale, DR et al. A systematic review of effective interventions for reducing multiple health risk behaviors in adolescence. American Journal of Public Health, 2014 published online March 13.

28. Working with youth: tips for small business owners. Geneva, International Labour Office, 2008.

29. Working with youth: tips for small business owners. Geneva, International Labour Office, 2008.

30. 2012 world population data sheet. Washington, DC, Population Reference Bureau, 2012
(http://www.prb.org/pdf12/2012-population-data-sheet_eng.pdf, accessed on 6 February 2014).

31. Merkinaite S. et al. Young people and drugs: Next generation of harm reduction. International Journal of Drug Policy, 21:112-114.

32. Christensen T, Lægreid P. The whole-of-government approach to public sector reform. Public Administration Review, 2007, 67(6):1059–1066.

33. 2008-2013 action plan for the global strategy for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases: prevent and control cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2008.

34. Schwartländer B. et al. Towards an improved investment approach for an effective response to HIV/AIDS. The Lancet, 2011, 277:2031–2041.

35. Investing for results. results for people. a people-centred investment tool towards ending AIDS. Geneva, UNAIDS, 2012.

36. Nicholls R, Raman S, Girdwood A. Can inter-sectoral collaboration improve adolescent sexual and reproductive health? Health, media and education partnerships in developing countries. Sydney, Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub, University of New South Wales, 2012.





Accelerating action for the health of the world’s adolescents